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Thread: walk-off

  1. #1
    Encolpius is offline Junior Member
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    Default walk-off

    Hello, here is this sentence:

    Are you challenging me to a walk-off?

    What does walk-off mean in this sentence?

    Thanks a lot.

  2. #2
    emsr2d2's Avatar
    emsr2d2 is offline Moderator
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    Default Re: walk-off

    Quote Originally Posted by Encolpius View Post
    Hello, here is this sentence:

    Are you challenging me to a walk-off?

    What does walk-off mean in this sentence?

    Thanks a lot.
    I think this is a relatively recent addition to the language. It basically means a competition.
    In America, they have competitions to see, for example, who can eat the most hamburgers in a certain length of time. This would be called an "eat-off".
    So I assume in your sentence the speaker is asking if the other person is challenging them to a competition or a race in which they will both be walking.

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