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  1. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #1

    Talk to vs talk with

    Hi, just a quick question to other ESL teachers here.

    Do you generally teach "to talk to" or "to talk with"? Most of my students have picked up a lot of their English from American TV, films or visits to the USA and consequently seem to say "talk with" a lot.

    As a British English native speaker, I use "to talk to" (although I frequently explain the expression "The company is in talks with various manufacturers....")

    Do you see talk to/with as a British/American difference? I generally teach both but am currently working on an exercise using prepositions and I really only want one possible correct answer for each question.

    Thanks.

  2. Neillythere's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: Talk to vs talk with

    Hi emsr2d2

    As an NES, but not a teacher, I would personnaly use:

    "talk to" in a case where I did most of the talking, as in: "I'll have to talk to him (a naughty child) about it.

    "talk with" where I needed to discuss something with the other person.

    It's just my way, teachers may have a different view.

    Hope this helps

    Regards
    NT

  3. Raymott's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: Talk to vs talk with

    Quote Originally Posted by emsr2d2 View Post
    I generally teach both but am currently working on an exercise using prepositions and I really only want one possible correct answer for each question.

    Thanks.
    I say both.
    If you want to set questions with only one answer, why not avoid verbs like 'talk' that you know have more than one answer?


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    #4

    Re: Talk to vs talk with

    It depends on what you are trying to use. Like for example I want to talk to my teacher tomorrow about a grade at school. I want to talk with a student about my grade.

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    #5

    Re: Talk to vs talk with

    I was taught to say 'talk to', and that 'talk with' is an informal usage.
    However I have noticed that only 'with' is used when talk is used as a noun as in the example above (talks with manufacturers) or I'd like to have a talk with you.


    I'm not a native. I may be wrong.

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