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  1. #1
    vil is offline VIP Member
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    Default retread tires/sneak out/dizzy/draft/let down/check out/run out

    Dear teachers,

    Would you be kind enough to tell me whether I am right with my interpretation of the expressions in bold in the following sentences?

    He's not going to a special school to retread tires!
    retread = regenerate
    "retread a tire" is to put a new covering on the tire

    Jenny would sneak out and come to my house.
    The boy had sneaked out of the room while we weren't looking.
    The soldier was charted with sneaking army food out of the camp.
    sneak out = leave furtively and stealthily

    And don't try to sneak out of your duties like you did last time!
    sneak out = elude, tergiversate (something undesirable)

    And do not try dodge from your responsibilities so, as it was in last times.
    dodge = avoid or try to avoid fulfilling, answering, or performing (duties, questions, or issues)

    I’m dizzy! I feel dizzy! I’m quite dizzy!
    It dizzies one to look down from the tower.
    dizzy = giddy; a confused feeling combined with a fear you may fall down

    I was looking to buy a boat on my own and then I got drafted .
    draft = engage somebody to enter the army

    I sure hope I won't let her down.
    Let down = fail to meet the hopes or expectations of = disappoint

    You have to check out that hole.
    check out = investigate or evaluate something or someone; observe carefully

    I grabbed him up and run him out of there.
    run out = compel to leave = force or drive someone away

    Lots of people ran out to see what had caused the noise.
    Crowds of people ran into the street look at, that happening.
    run out = leave (a home) suddenly and as if in a hurry

    The water runs in at this end and runs out at the other.
    run out = flow out

    The contract runs out next week.
    I've run out of coffee.
    The money is running out.
    run out = become void, expire, become used up or exhausted, end

    I've run myself out, I can't go any further.
    run out = stale; gasp (during running)

    The total area runs out at 25,000 square miles.
    run out = reach, treat

    You can't run out on your family at a time like this.
    You can't run out on the contract, or you could be taken to court.
    run out = escape

    What does the cost of repairs run out at?
    The actual bill runs out at considerably more than the original estimate.
    run out = figure out

    The aid did not arrive on time giving us the feeling of having been run out on.
    His wife ran out on him. (she left him)
    run out on = desert, abandon

    Thank you for your efforts.

    Regards,

    V.

  2. #2
    Tdol is offline Editor, UsingEnglish.com
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    Default Re: retread tires/sneak out/dizzy/draft/let down/check out/run out

    The first doesn't sound very natural to me, but I don't know if it's used in other variants of English.
    Last edited by Tdol; 25-Mar-2010 at 08:00. Reason: Missing article added

  3. #3
    sarat_106 is offline Key Member
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    Exclamation Re: retread tires/sneak out/dizzy/draft/let down/check out/run out

    Quote Originally Posted by vil View Post
    Dear teachers,

    Would you be kind enough to tell me whether I am right with my interpretation of the expressions in bold in the following sentences?
    He's not going to a special workshop/school to retread tires!
    retread = regenerate
    "retread a tire" is to put a new covering on the tire
    Jenny would sneak in/out through the back door and come to my house.
    The boy had sneaked out of the room while we weren't looking.
    The soldier was charted with sneaking army food out of the camp.
    sneak out = leave furtively and stealthily This is a common application.
    He managed to sneak out of the town without being seen by any body
    And don't try to sneak out of your duties like you did last time!
    sneak out = elude, tergiversate (something undesirable)

    Thank you for your efforts.

    Regards,

    V.
    In India, rethreading of used or worn-out tires is done by special workshops equipped with proper arrangement to carry out the process.

    Sneak out meaning leave furtively and stealthily, is normally used but not the other one, which can be said as:
    And don't try to sneak out of office to elude your duties like you did last time!

  4. #4
    Tdol is offline Editor, UsingEnglish.com
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    Default Re: retread tires/sneak out/dizzy/draft/let down/check out/run out

    If it's a literal meaning, then I would use something like 'special school to end up retreading tyres'. When I first read it, I thought it might refer to the education- going through the same things again.

  5. #5
    vil is offline VIP Member
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    Default Re: retread tires/sneak out/dizzy/draft/let down/check out/run out

    The sentence in question is from “Forrest Gamp”. In my opinion you have to thing about a figurative meaning of the phrase “he is going to a special school to retread tires”
    Forrest has a IQ 75. IQ = "Intelligence Quotient," which is the standard test to measure a person's intelligence. An IQ of 100 is considered normal, which means that Forrest has an IQ which may be close to "retarded," or as some people say in the 1990's, "mentally challenged." He might be a bit on the slow side. "He might be a little dumb." He's not going to a special school to retread tires!

    Regards,

    V.

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