Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 11 to 17 of 17
  1. #11
    fenglish is offline Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Other
      • Native Language:
      • Chinese
      • Home Country:
      • China
      • Current Location:
      • China
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Posts
    207
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: "sleeping" and "sleep", adjective or verb or gerund

    Quote Originally Posted by mmasny View Post
    What language do you speak? Maybe someone who knows your language could help you better.
    I am trying to thinking in English now.

  2. #12
    sarat_106 is offline Key Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • Oriya
      • Home Country:
      • India
      • Current Location:
      • India
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Posts
    2,129
    Post Thanks / Like

    Exclamation Re: "sleeping" and "sleep", adjective or verb or gerund

    Quote Originally Posted by fenglish View Post
    I think I have been got the wrong concepts about "participle" and "gerund" before.

    From Answers.com participle: Definition from Answers.com, it has a little complex for me.

    Is there a way to know it clearly?
    The dictionary has explained with examples how to identify a participle phrase correctly and not to confuse with other phrases looking similar. Let me explain the matter from the basics.

    A verb can have a present participle form and a past participle form.
    A present participle can have three functions in sentences. It can be component of multipart verb , or it can function as adjective or noun. A past participle can be component of a multipart verb and can function as adjective.

    Here are some examples of past and present participles functioning as adjective to modify nouns or pronouns.
    You can see his bruised face, broken arm, and bleeding knees as a result of that accident.
    That's an interesting book.
    That tree is a weeping willow.
    Similarly a participle phrase is an adjective phrase that starts with a participle. It usually follows the noun (or pronoun) which it modifies.
    Is that John running for the bus? ( Present participle phrase)
    We must raise funds to replace the window broken last week in the storm. (past participle phrase)
    Whenever a present participle functions as a noun, we call it a gerund. So a gerund can be the subjects, direct objects, indirect objects, objects of prepositions, and subject complements in sentence

    Take a look at these examples:
    Walking is a good exercise.
    Walking=subject of the sentence’
    Mary hates cooking.
    Cooking = the direct object of the verb hates.
    We gave jumping a chance.
    jumping = indirect object of the verb gave.

    Similarly a gerund phrase begins with a gerund and might include other modifiers and/or objects and functions as subjects, subject complements, or objects in the sentence. See these examples

    Eating ice cream on a windy day can be a messy experience.
    Eating ice cream on a windy day = subject of the verb can be.
    Wild food adventures require getting your hair cut to a short length.
    Getting your hair cut to a short = direct object of the verb require.

    But be careful, Gerund and present participle phrases are easy to confuse because they both begin with an ing word. The difference is that a gerund phrase will always function as a noun while a present participle phrase describes another word in the sentence.

  3. #13
    fenglish is offline Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Other
      • Native Language:
      • Chinese
      • Home Country:
      • China
      • Current Location:
      • China
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Posts
    207
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: "sleeping" and "sleep", adjective or verb or gerund

    Thanks.

    It can be component of multipart verb , or it can function as adjective or noun.
    what is "multipart verb"?

    Now, I have read the definition of "present participle", "past participle", "participle", and "gerund" from Answers.com carefully.

    And I want to write a conclusion about it. Please correct me if I am wrong (any wrong, including: Grammar, Concept, Conclusion, Sentence Structure etc.) .

    1. Present Participle always compounded with the auxiliary (be, was, am , are, were) to form a progressive tense to indicate a present action.

    2. Past Participle always compounded with the auxiliary (has, had, have) to form a passive voice or perfect tense to indicate a completed action.

    3. Dangling Participle always missing the auxiliary (be, was, am, are, has, had, have), and the verb must in the form of "-ing", and must not in the form of "-ed". Even if the form is "-ing", but the "-ing" in dangling participle is not a progressive tense.

    (I am not sure of this)

    As in: Turning the corner, the view was quite different.
    Can I say: Turned the corner, the view was quite different.

    As in: Trying to thinking in English.
    Can I say: Tried to thinking in English.

    4. Gerund is just a noun, it is derived from a verb and has the form of "-ing", but it can not following directly by an object. In opposing side, Present Participle is not a Gerund.

    5. The verb formed the participle is a infinitive verb.

    (I can not understand the meaning of finite verb, as in the definition from Answers.com: Of or relating to any of the forms of a verb that can occur on their own in a main clause and that can formally express distinctions in person, number, tense, mood, and voice, often by means of conjugation, as the verb sees in She sees the sign.)
    Last edited by fenglish; 27-Mar-2010 at 20:37.

  4. #14
    mmasny is offline Key Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Student or Learner
      • Native Language:
      • Polish
      • Home Country:
      • Poland
      • Current Location:
      • Poland
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Posts
    1,704
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: "sleeping" and "sleep", adjective or verb or gerund

    Quote Originally Posted by fenglish View Post
    Thanks.

    what is "multipart verb"? Here is an explanation: http://www.usingenglish.com/forum/as...ic-salary.html

    Now, I have read the definition of "present participle", "past participle", "participle", and "gerund" from Answers.com carefully.

    And I want to write a conclusion about it. Please correct me if I am wrong (any wrong, including: Grammar, Concept, Conclusion, Sentence Structure etc.) .

    1. Present Participle always compounded with the auxiliary (be, was, am , are, were) to form a progressive tense to indicate a present action. No it's not correct. A present participle can be used without an auxiliary. I think you excluded these cases for the sake of the 'dangling participle', See an explanation below. To make it clear: a present participle has always the '-ing' suffix.

    2. Past Participle always compounded with the auxiliary (has, had, have) to form a passive voice or perfect tense to indicate a completed action.
    Again, the past participle does not have to have an auxiliary before it. To make it clear: a past participle has always the '-ed' suffix (with the exception of irregular verbs).
    3. Dangling Participle always missing the auxiliary (be, was, am, are, has, had, have), and the verb must in the form of "-ing", and must not in the form of "-ed". Even if the form is "-ing", but the "-ing" in dangling participle is not a progressive tense.

    (I am not sure of this) You're right not being sure, because it's wrong. A dangling participle is a name of an error in a sentence, not a correct grammatical form.

    As in: Turning the corner, the view was quite different. This is a good example of a dangling participle. It is not a correct sentence.
    Can I say: Turned the corner, the view was quite different.

    As in: Trying to thinking in English. First of all it's not correct because we should use an infinitve after 'try to'. So it should read 'trying to think in English'. Now, it's not a sentence. There's no finite verb here. But it's a correct phrase. (Look at this to learn what a phrase is.)
    Can I say: Tried to thinking in English.

    4. Gerund is just a noun, it is derived from a verb and has the form of "-ing", but it can not following directly by an object. In opposing side, Present Participle is not a Gerund. Did you mean 'cannot be followed directly...'?

    5. The verb formed the participle is a infinitive verb. Did you mean 'the verb that formed the participle...'?

    (I can not understand the meaning of finite verb, as in the definition from Answers.com: Of or relating to any of the forms of a verb that can occur on their own in a main clause and that can formally express distinctions in person, number, tense, mood, and voice, often by means of conjugation, as the verb sees in She sees the sign.) See below.
    This is a bunch of very good questions. I tried to touch almost all of them. I know my answers aren't full. They are not supposed to be. Simply, this is too much for one thread. I recommend that you make the cited post your itinerary. Ask all questions that come to your mind after reading this reply (and maybe other replies, if they are going to appear) in separate threads. And please, don't ask them all at once. You will get lost instead of learning anything.

    It will take some time, but it's the only way. This is a lot of knowledge and you won't learn it all at once.

    Good luck!

    I am not a teacher, please note that.
    Last edited by mmasny; 27-Mar-2010 at 21:20. Reason: added 'to make it clear' part

  5. #15
    sarat_106 is offline Key Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • Oriya
      • Home Country:
      • India
      • Current Location:
      • India
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Posts
    2,129
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: "sleeping" and "sleep", adjective or verb or gerund

    Quote Originally Posted by fenglish View Post
    Thanks.

    what is "multipart verb"?
    Please remember that verbs can have more than one part(componrnt). In fact, a verb can have as many as four parts. A multi-part verb has a base or main part as well as additional helping or auxiliary verbs with it. Check out the examples below:
    You must remember that verbs can have more than one part. In fact, a verb can have as many as four parts. A multi-part verb has a base or main part as well as additional helping or auxiliary verbs with it. Check out the examples below:

    Harvey spilled chocolate milkshake on Leslie's new dress. (one part)

    Because Harvey is a klutz, he is always spilling something. (two-part)

    Harvey might have spilled the chocolate milkshake because the short dress distracted him. (three-part)

    Harvey should have been spilling the chocolate milkshake down his throat. (four-part)


    Now, I have read the definition of "present participle", "past participle", "participle", and "gerund" from Answers.com carefully.

    And I want to write a conclusion about it. Please correct me if I am wrong (any wrong, including: Grammar, Concept, Conclusion, Sentence Structure etc.) .

    1. Present Participle always compounded with the auxiliary (be, was, am , are, were) to form a progressive tense to indicate a present action.
    Yes, it functions as a compound or two-part verb.
    2. Past Participle always compounded with the auxiliary (has, had, have) to form a passive voice or perfect tense to indicate a completed action.

    Yes, it functions as a compound or two-part verb.
    Skp

  6. #16
    fenglish is offline Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Other
      • Native Language:
      • Chinese
      • Home Country:
      • China
      • Current Location:
      • China
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Posts
    207
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: "sleeping" and "sleep", adjective or verb or gerund

    Quote Originally Posted by sarat_106 View Post
    Skp
    Thanks.

    What about the conclusion 3, 4, and 5 ?

    And I think the sentence "Trying to thinking in English." is right, because I want to use "thinking in English" as an object.

  7. #17
    sarat_106 is offline Key Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • Oriya
      • Home Country:
      • India
      • Current Location:
      • India
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Posts
    2,129
    Post Thanks / Like

    Exclamation Re: "sleeping" and "sleep", adjective or verb or gerund

    Quote Originally Posted by fenglish View Post
    Thanks.

    what is "multipart verb"?

    Now, I have read the definition of "present participle", "past participle", "participle", and "gerund" from Answers.com carefully.

    And I want to write a conclusion about it. Please correct me if I am wrong (any wrong, including: Grammar, Concept, Conclusion, Sentence Structure etc.) .

    3. Dangling Participle always missing the auxiliary (be, was, am, are, has, had, have), and the verb must in the form of "-ing", and must not in the form of "-ed". Even if the form is "-ing", but the "-ing" in dangling participle is not a progressive tense.

    (I am not sure of this) For the sake of clarity, a participle should be attached to the grammatical subject of a sentence, as in "Looking through the window, I saw the garden." Because the participial phrase "Lookng through the window" is attached to the subject "I," it is clear that "I" is doing the looking. But when the participle is attached to the object instead of the subject, as: “I saw the garden looking through the window.”, the meaning of the sentence is confused---it "dangles"---so that you don't know whether it modifies the subject or the object. So proper placement of the phrase is essential in order to avoid dangling which is considered as an error.
    As in: Turning the corner, the view was quite different.
    Can I say: Turned the corner, the view was quite different.

    As in: Trying to thinking in English.
    Can I say: Tried to thinking in English.

    4. Gerund is just a noun, it is derived from a verb and has the form of "-ing", but it can not following directly by an object. In opposing side, Present Participle is not a Gerund.Not exactly, in English, the gerund is identical in form to the present participle (ending in -ing) and can behave as a verb within a clause (so that it may be modified by an adverb or have an object),

    5. The verb formed the participle is a infinitive verb.
    It is not clear. Infinitive is a simple verb form usually preceded by the word "to.", as To go, To eat etc

    (I can not understand the meaning of finite verb, as in the definition from Answers.com: Of or relating to any of the forms of a verb that can occur on their own in a main clause and that can formally express distinctions in person, number, tense, mood, and voice, often by means of conjugation, as the verb sees in She sees the sign.)
    And I think the sentence Trying to thinki in English is right. (use to think)
    For using "thinking in English" as an object. ", you can say: Please try thinking in English.
    Skp
    Last edited by sarat_106; 28-Mar-2010 at 11:46.

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Hotchalk