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  1. #1
    fenglish is offline Member
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    Question "sleeping" and "sleep", adjective or verb or gerund

    Hi,

    I found the definition of "sleeping" and "sleep" from Answers.com,

    A. sleeping: sleeping: Definition, Synonyms from Answers.com,

    Within this link, it defined sleeping as "adjective",

    B. sleep: sleep: Definition, Synonyms from Answers.com,

    Within this link, it defined sleep as "noun" and "verb",
    Please note that the verb definition of sleep: v., slept, sleepˇing, sleeps. , it also includes the sleeping in verb.

    So, when I found a sleeping word in some sentences, what kind of meaning should I use? adjective or verb or gerund ?

    For example: "Sleeping with the telephone", I always thought the "Sleeping" in here is a gerund before.

    Thanks.

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    mmasny is offline Key Member
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    Re: "sleeping" and "sleep", adjective or verb or gerund

    'Sleeping' can play different roles in a sentence. It is so even in your sample phrase (by the way, who sleeps with a telephone?). It all depends on the context.

    Sleeping with the telephone, I dreamed about my friends.
    I was sleeping with the telephone.
    Sleeping with the telephone causes fatal lung cancer.
    The person sleeping with the telephone, get yourself together and put the telephone aside!

    Each of these sentences employs your phrase for a different purpose. Would you try to recognize them?

    Please note that I am not a teacher and can be wrong.

  3. #3
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    Raymott is offline VIP Member
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    Re: "sleeping" and "sleep", adjective or verb or gerund

    Quote Originally Posted by mmasny View Post
    Sleeping with the telephone causes fatal lung cancer.
    Only if you inhale.
    Otherwise, you're right, of course.

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    sarat_106 is offline Key Member
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    Exclamation Re: "sleeping" and "sleep", adjective or verb or gerund

    Quote Originally Posted by fenglish View Post

    So, when I found a sleeping word in some sentences, what kind of meaning should I use? adjective or verb or gerund ?

    For example: "Sleeping with the telephone", I always thought the "Sleeping" in here is a gerund before.

    Thanks.
    A word (or phrase) can have different part of speech depending on what kind of idea the word (or phrase) communicates and its function in a sentence.. The word ‘sleep’ basically denotes ‘action’ and functions as verb but it can be used as noun; as:
    He has a brief sleep after lunch.
    As you know any verb has four forms and so also the verb ‘sleep’: the present(sleep), the past (slept), the present participle (sleeping) and the past participle (slept). The present participle form ‘sleeping’ can be used as an adjective or noun(called gerund) depending on the use. The expression ‘Sleeping with the telephone’ is a phrase with ‘sleeping’ at its head. So if you use the phrase as subject of a sentence it functions as a gerund phrase; refer to the example by mmasny:
    Sleeping with the telephone causes fatal lung cancer.(subject)
    Fatal lung cancer can be due to Sleeping with the telephone. (object of the preposition ‘to’)
    I am sleeping with the telephone for years without any effect. (verb)
    He is only a sleeping partner in the business. (adjective)

  5. #5
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    whitemoon is offline Senior Member
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    Re: "sleeping" and "sleep", adjective or verb or gerund

    let me add some explanation of present participle.

    Of the two actions done by one person, the first action can be shown with present participle.
    He had breakfast and then left the house.
    Having breakfast, he left the house.

    When two actions happen at the same time and are done by one person, present participle can be used to show one of them.
    I am working in the garden. I am singing an English song.
    I am working in the garden, singing an English song.
    I am singing an English song, working in the garden.

    Present participle can be used instead of a phrase starting as, since, because. It explains the cause or reason for an action.
    Because I am a student, I have to learn six subjects.
    Being a student, I have to learn six subjects.

    Therse three usages of present participle can be called "adverbial clauses".

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    fenglish is offline Member
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    Re: "sleeping" and "sleep", adjective or verb or gerund

    Does any verb has the gerund form? ( verb + ing )

  7. #7
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    whitemoon is offline Senior Member
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    Re: "sleeping" and "sleep", adjective or verb or gerund

    Every verb has present, past, past participle and present participle.
    present = am/is/are , has/have, go
    past = was/were , had , went
    past participle = been, had , gone
    present participle = being, having, going

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    corum is offline Banned
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    Re: "sleeping" and "sleep", adjective or verb or gerund

    Quote Originally Posted by fenglish View Post
    Does any verb has the gerund form? ( verb + ing )
    No. What is the present participle form of, say, may, or could? They haven't. And one more thing: gerund is not a formal notion. It is a functional category. 'Gerunds' have present pariticiple form.

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    fenglish is offline Member
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    Re: "sleeping" and "sleep", adjective or verb or gerund

    I think I have been got the wrong concepts about "participle" and "gerund" before.

    From Answers.com participle: Definition from Answers.com, it has a little complex for me.

    Is there a way to know it clearly?

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    mmasny is offline Key Member
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    Re: "sleeping" and "sleep", adjective or verb or gerund

    What language do you speak? Maybe someone who knows your language could help you better.

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