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  1. #1
    ph2004 is offline Member
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    Default ten euro/euros ?

    Can one also say "ten euro" instead of "ten euros" ?
    If I am correct one has to say "ten dollars" and not "ten dollar" ?

  2. #2
    sarat_106 is offline Key Member
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    Exclamation Re: ten euro/euros ?

    Quote Originally Posted by ph2004 View Post
    Can one also say "ten euro" instead of "ten euros" ?
    If I am correct one has to say "ten dollars" and not "ten dollar" ?
    No, Euro is an unit of money and is a countable noun. So you have to say:
    ten Euros = 13.505 U.S. dollars

  3. #3
    Allen165 is offline Key Member
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    Default Re: ten euro/euros ?

    "10 euro" is also correct, at least according to my dictionary, but "10 euros" sounds better. And I don't think you have to capitalize "euro."

    Not a teacher.

  4. #4
    BobK's Avatar
    BobK is offline Harmless drudge
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    Default Re: ten euro/euros ?

    Quote Originally Posted by Jasmin165 View Post
    "10 euro" is also correct, at least according to my dictionary, but "10 euros" sounds better. And I don't think you have to capitalize "euro."

    Not a teacher.
    Check whether that dictionary accepts the s-less version only as an adjective.

    The ticket cost ten Euros.

    but

    It is a ten Euro ticket.

    Note: the dictionary might not mention adjectives but just give an acceptable example (which happens to be an adjective).

    (Note: in informal speech the S can be dropped in some cases: "Ten quid? It's not worth a fiver." But I've never heard 'Euro' used like this; maybe I would have - if we used it more in the UK.)

    b

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