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  1. #1
    Runee Guest

    Default "For the better"

    I had this argument thingy with my English teacher, because I used "For the better" in a sentence. ("Even though the weather is nice, it is for the better not to forget your umbrella".) Now, I know it was most likely better to write "Even though the weather is nice, it's better not to forget your umbrella." but, alas, I kind of forgot about that.

    So, my question is, was the first sentence correct english or not ? ^^
    Thanks !

  2. #2
    Tdol is offline Editor, UsingEnglish.com
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    Default Re: "For the better"

    Did you post this elsewhere? I'm sure I answered earlier. It's a clumsy sentence. It is the kind of form that might be found in a dialect, but I don't know whether it is.

  3. #3
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    Default Re: "For the better"

    What about the expression 'a change for the better/worse'? I don't think they are clumsy

  4. #4
    Tdol is offline Editor, UsingEnglish.com
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    Default Re: "For the better"

    That's fine- I was only speaking about this context.

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