Results 1 to 4 of 4

Thread: for carrying

  1. #1
    navi tasan is offline Key Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Academic
      • Native Language:
      • Armenian
      • Home Country:
      • Iran
      • Current Location:
      • United States
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Posts
    1,939
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default for carrying

    Are these sentences correct:

    1-A basket, for carrying bricks, was beside the door.
    2-The basket, for carrying bricks, was beside the door. (For: The basket, which was for carrying bricks ...)


    3-A basket, to carry bricks in, was beside the door.
    4-The basket, to carry bricks in, was beside the door.

  2. #2
    RonBee's Avatar
    RonBee is offline Moderator
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Other
      • Native Language:
      • American English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Posts
    16,571
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: for carrying

    Quote Originally Posted by navi tasan
    Are these sentences correct:

    1-A basket, for carrying bricks, was beside the door.
    2-The basket, for carrying bricks, was beside the door. (For: The basket, which was for carrying bricks ...)


    3-A basket, to carry bricks in, was beside the door.
    4-The basket, to carry bricks in, was beside the door.
    Yes, but you don't need the commas. For example, in the first sentence the complete subject is A basket for carrying bricks.

    :)

  3. #3
    navi tasan is offline Key Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Academic
      • Native Language:
      • Armenian
      • Home Country:
      • Iran
      • Current Location:
      • United States
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Posts
    1,939
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: for carrying

    Thanks for all your replies RonBee.
    I normally use the sentences without commas, but I wanted to see if they could work with commas. The bit after the comma is supposed to give extra information, more or less added as an after-thought. it is supposed to work like a non-restrictive relative clause, a bit like: "the basket, which was for ...) [In contrast to: the basket which was for...]
    Do you think that my original sentences are wrong without the commas?
    The fourth one seems wrong to me.

  4. #4
    RonBee's Avatar
    RonBee is offline Moderator
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Other
      • Native Language:
      • American English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Posts
    16,571
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    It makes a difference whether you use a basket or the basket.

    [list]1-A basket, for carrying bricks, was beside the door.
    2-The basket, for carrying bricks, was beside the door. (For: The basket, which was for carrying bricks ...)


    3-A basket, to carry bricks in, was beside the door.
    4-The basket, to carry bricks in, was beside the door.[list]

    If you use a basket for carrying bricks or a basket to carry bricks in there is no suggestion that other baskets are involved. If you say the basket for carrying bricks or the basket to carry bricks in there is the suggestion that there are other baskets nearby or other baskets involved in the discussion. In sentences two and four, if you use the commas, the appositional phrase ("for carrying bricks" or "to carry bricks in") modifies basket, explaining what it is for. In that case, there is no suggestion that there are or might be other baskets involved.

    :)

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •