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  1. #1
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    Question What are "it's worth every penny" and "That's an outstanding piece of.."?

    Dear all.
    I've listened the following conversation. I havn't understood two sentences. They are "That's an outstanding piece of Depression glass " and "It's worth every penny.". If somebody knows, please help me.
    I'm waiting for your reply.
    Your sincerely

    -------------------------------
    Lynn Bunker is at a flea market in a small Connecticut town. She's just seen a glass bowl at one of the stands. She collects American glass objects made during the 1930s. She's interested in buying the bowl.
    -----------------------------------------------------





    Lynn: Excuse me. How much do you want for this bowl?
    Stand owner: Let's see. Hmm.... That's an outstanding piece of Depression glass - in perfect shape. It's worth 150 bucks.
    Lynn: A hundred and fifty dollars! Oh, I couldn't possibly pay that much. It's a shame. It really is nice.
    Owner: Hold on, lady. I said it was worth 150 bucks. I'm only asking $115.
    Lynn: A hundred and fifteen dollars?
    Owner: Yeah, it's a real bargain!
    Lynn: Oh, I'm sure it is. But I can't afford that.
    Owner: Well, look. Tell you what I'll do. I'll make it an even $100. I can't go any lower than that.
    Lynn: I'll give you $65.
    Owner: Sixty-five! Come on, lady. You've got to be kidding. I paid more than that for it myself. Take it for $90. It's worth every penny.
    Lynn: Well, maybe I could give you $75.
    Owner: Eighty-five. That's my final price.
    Lynn: Eighty.
    Owner: Make it $83.
    Lynn: OK. Eighty-three.
    Owner: Let me wrap it up for you. There you are, lady - a real bargain.
    Lynn: Yeah, thanks a lot.










  2. #2
    digitS''s Avatar
    digitS' is offline Newbie
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    Default Re: What are "it's worth every penny" and "That's an outstanding piece of.."?

    An outstanding piece is a superior example.

    "Depression glass n. Machine-pressed, tinted glassware mass-produced during the 1920s and 1930s." thefreedictionary.com

    It's worth every penny (of $90).
    penny = cent
    It is worth all 9000 cents.

    I hope that helps.

    Steve

  3. #3
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    Question Re: What are "it's worth every penny" and "That's an outstanding piece of.."?

    Quote Originally Posted by digitS' View Post


    It's worth every penny (of $90).
    penny = cent
    It is worth all 9000 cents.

    I hope that helps.

    Steve

    ----
    Thank you for your answer. But one thing i'm still not clear.
    Right after "Take it for $90", is the sentence "It's worth every penny=It is worth all 9000 cents". It means according to this context

    I can not reduce any more, even 1 cent.

    I think, one thing was able to understand between Stand owner and Buyer in this conversation $90 = 9000 cents.

    All of thing above is what I feel, if it's wrong, please tell me more.
    Your sincerely

  4. #4
    mfwills is offline Junior Member
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    Default Re: What are "it's worth every penny" and "That's an outstanding piece of.."?

    "It's worth every penny" does not actually break the price down in cents. If something costs $90, one doesn't usually bother with converting it to how many pennies that represents.

    At its core, it is the speaker's strong opinion that the item is well worth the price being paid, whatever it may be, and that not even so much as a penny of the total would be challenged. It is a typical example of using an exaggeration to express such an opinion.

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