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  1. #1
    Ju is offline Senior Member
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    Default "She feels the butterlies for him."

    There is an article talking about relationship about men and
    women.

    1. May I know the meaning of the following sentence?
    2. Any other example of using butterlies with the same meaning?

    "She feels the butterlies for him."

    Tks / ju

  2. #2
    emsr2d2's Avatar
    emsr2d2 is offline Moderator
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    Default Re: "She feels the butterlies for him."

    Quote Originally Posted by Ju View Post
    There is an article talking about relationship about men and
    women.

    1. May I know the meaning of the following sentence?
    2. Any other example of using butterlies with the same meaning?

    "She feels the butterlies for him."

    Tks / ju
    That particular sentence makes no sense. You "get butterflies" - you don't feel them for someone else. A better sentence would have been:

    She gets butterflies when she thinks about him.

  3. #3
    Ouisch's Avatar
    Ouisch is offline Moderator
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    Default Re: "She feels the butterlies for him."

    The usual expression is "I've got butterflies in my stomach," but writers often use variations of this phrase to make a point. When a person feels "butterflies" it means they have a sort of nervous feeling of excitement. People get "butterflies" when they're nervous (like when they have to make a speech in front of a large group of people) or when they're nervous/excitied (like when they've been nominated for an Academy Award and they're waiting for the winner to be announced) or when they're happy/excited (like when they've met the person of their dreams - he/she is so beautiful to them and treats them so nicely, they can hardly believe he/she is real!). Think of a group of butterflies actually fluttering their wings inside your tummy - it sort of tickles, it's sort of upsetting, whatever the situation you just can't relax because of that fluttery feeling.

  4. #4
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    Default Re: "She feels the butterlies for him."

    Quote Originally Posted by emsr2d2 View Post
    That particular sentence makes no sense. You "get butterflies" - you don't feel them for someone else. A better sentence would have been:

    She gets butterflies when she thinks about him.
    Quote Originally Posted by Ouisch View Post
    The usual expression is "I've got butterflies in my stomach," but writers often use variations of this phrase to make a point. When a person feels "butterflies" it means they have a sort of nervous feeling of excitement. People get "butterflies" when they're nervous (like when they have to make a speech in front of a large group of people) or when they're nervous/excitied (like when they've been nominated for an Academy Award and they're waiting for the winner to be announced) or when they're happy/excited (like when they've met the person of their dreams - he/she is so beautiful to them and treats them so nicely, they can hardly believe he/she is real!). Think of a group of butterflies actually fluttering their wings inside your tummy - it sort of tickles, it's sort of upsetting, whatever the situation you just can't relax because of that fluttery feeling.

    Right! I also think as a student of English idiom that the plural noun "butterflies" is usually used with get, have, give to mean getting, being, making nervous; giving a shaky feeling at knees and "fluttery" in stomach.

  5. #5
    BobK's Avatar
    BobK is offline Harmless drudge
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    Default Re: "She feels the butterlies for him."

    I've never met 'feel butterflies for' to mean 'fancy'. Without the context of sexual relationships, I would have guessed that he felt nervous about something (or might have been expected to feel nervous but didn't) and she felt butterflies in her stomach on his behalf: John did not seem much concerned about the interview, but Jane felt the butterflies for him.

    b
    Last edited by BobK; 12-Apr-2010 at 11:52. Reason: Fix format

  6. #6
    emsr2d2's Avatar
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    Default Re: "She feels the butterlies for him."

    Quote Originally Posted by BobK View Post
    I've never met 'feel butterflies for' to mean 'fancy'. Without the context of sexual relationships, I would have guessed that he felt nervous about something (or might have been expected to feel nervous but didn't) and she felt butterflies in her stomach on his behalf: John did not seem much concerned about the interview, but Jane felt the butterflies for him.

    b
    I wouldn't say that it actually means "to fancy" per se, but I can safely say that when you do "fancy" someone, and then you think about them, you sometimes get those butterflies! I do, at least!!

    I agree that it's possible to be nervous on someone else's behalf, though the OP said the article was about the relationship between men and women so that's why I went for my definition.

    It's a good thing there are so many people on here who have different interpretations of sentences! It shows how confusing any language can be!

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