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  1. #1
    diplomacy is offline Member
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    Default questions on grammars

    I shall call you before 7 o'clock.

    shall used instead of will why?

    in phrasal verbs is it correct to say:

    turn off light

    turn off it

  2. #2
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    Default Re: questions on grammars

    Quote Originally Posted by diplomacy View Post
    I shall call you before 7 o'clock.

    shall used instead of will why?

    in phrasal verbs is it correct to say:

    turn off light

    turn off it
    "Shall" has been used since "I" takes "shall" and not "will".

    "Will" will be used when it is sure that "I" will call.

    So

    I will call you before 7 o'clock.
    means that
    I surely will call .... and that it is necessary. May be because there is something important going on.

    Whereas

    I shall cal you before 7 o'clock.
    means that
    I shall call you before this time but still it could be a few minutes earlier or later.

    NOT A TEACHER

  3. #3
    TheParser is offline VIP Member
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    Default Re: questions on grammars

    Quote Originally Posted by diplomacy View Post
    I shall call you before 7 o'clock.

    shall used instead of will why?

    in phrasal verbs is it correct to say:

    turn off light

    turn off it
    ***** NOT A TEACHER *****

    Good afternoon, diplomacy.

    (1) I believe that in the United States, people prefer to say: Turn it off.

    ("Turn off it" is not idiomatic in the United States. Idiomatic = the way most people speak.)

    It is probably better to say:

    Fill it out
    Wake her up
    Throw them away
    Pay me back
    Put them on
    Write it down
    Take them off

    Have a nice day!

  4. #4
    Barb_D's Avatar
    Barb_D is offline Moderator
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    Default Re: questions on grammars

    With phrasal verbs, you can usually have a noun before or after the preposition.

    Turn off the light. Turn the light off.
    Look up the word. Look the word up.
    Show off my new ring. Show my new ring off. (This one sounds a bit odd.)

    However, when you use a pronoun, it goes between the verb and the preposition.

    Turn it off. Look it up. Show it off.

    (Some phrasal verbs don't allow words to come between the verb and the preposition, but I'm having trouble thinking of any right now.)
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

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