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Thread: Doing a favour

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    #1

    Doing a favour

    Hi
    Do you know which is the correct way to ask for a favor?
    Sometimes I hear "Can you give me a favor?" and "Can you do me a favor"?:
    I Think that the second one is the correct one, but can you confirm me that is it so?
    Many Thanks!
    CS

  1. MASM's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: Doing a favour

    Quote Originally Posted by Conoscenza SIlente View Post
    Hi
    Do you know which is the correct way to ask for a favor?
    Sometimes I hear "Can you give me a favor?" and "Can you do me a favor"?:
    I Think that the second one is the correct one, but can you confirm me that is it so?
    Many Thanks!
    CS
    I'd say Can you do me a favour?, I've never heard the other sentence before, but maybe it's a common thing to say, I'm not sure.

    xxx

  2. Raymott's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: Doing a favour

    Quote Originally Posted by Conoscenza SIlente View Post
    Hi
    Do you know which is the correct way to ask for a favor?
    Sometimes I hear "Can you give me a favor?" and "Can you do me a favor"?:
    I Think that the second one is the correct one, but can you confirm me that is it so?
    Many Thanks!
    CS
    Yes, do, not give.
    Also more formally, "Please grant me a favour".

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    #4

    Re: Doing a favour

    The second one is the only one I've heard used in conversation. (Can you do me a favor....)


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    #5

    Re: Doing a favour

    yeah tha second one.........

  3. BobK's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: Doing a favour

    'Do' or 'grant'. I don't believe this could occur in any realistic context, but 'Give me a favour' forces an archaic meaning of favour. So, in a re-enactment of a mediŠval tournament, a knight who was about to fight might approach a lady and say 'Give me a favour', meaning 'Give me your handkerchief or some other pretty token that I can wear on my helmet to represent the object of my allegiance'.... Perhaps not.

    b

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    #7

    Re: Doing a favour

    Quote Originally Posted by BobK View Post
    'Do' or 'grant'. I don't believe this could occur in any realistic context, but 'Give me a favour' forces an archaic meaning of favour. So, in a re-enactment of a mediŠval tournament, a knight who was about to fight might approach a lady and say 'Give me a favour', meaning 'Give me your handkerchief or some other pretty token that I can wear on my helmet to represent the object of my allegiance'.... Perhaps not.

    b

    But would a mediŠval knight use a verb as direct as give?

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    #8

    Re: Doing a favour

    Quote Originally Posted by Tdol View Post
    But would a mediŠval knight use a verb as direct as give?
    Yup. 'Vouchsafe' would be nearer the mark.

    b


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    #9

    Re: Doing a favour

    yap, based on my understanding the second line is more used in the conversation...........

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