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  1. #1
    English confuse me Guest

    Smile Relative clause = Adjective clause VS participle clause = adverbial clause

    There is a discrepancy below.

    Relative clause = adjective clause
    1. The boy who is sitting in front of you is my cousin.
    Obviously, the relative clause above is adjective clause describing the boy.

    However, when I rephrase the clause into an adjective phrase.
    2. The boy sitting in front of you is my cousin.
    Apparently, the adjective phrase becomes a present participle clause.

    As we all know, participle clause = adverbial clause, for example:
    3. Seeing an accident ahead, I stopped my car.
    Also plainly, the participle clause above (non-finite) is adverbial clause.

    So, by conjecture, Participle clauses can also be used as adjective phrases.
    Have someone discover it before?

  2. #2
    Raymott's Avatar
    Raymott is online now VIP Member
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    Default Re: Relative clause = Adjective clause VS participle clause = adverbial clause

    Quote Originally Posted by English confuse me View Post
    There is a discrepancy below.

    Relative clause = adjective clause
    1. The boy who is sitting in front of you is my cousin.
    Obviously, the relative clause above is adjective clause describing the boy.

    However, when I rephrase the clause into an adjective phrase.
    2. The boy sitting in front of you is my cousin.
    Apparently, the adjective phrase becomes a present participle clause.

    As we all know, participle clause = adverbial clause, for example:
    3. Seeing an accident ahead, I stopped my car.
    Also plainly, the participle clause above (non-finite) is adverbial clause.

    So, by conjecture, Participle clauses can also be used as adjective phrases.
    Have someone discover it before?
    There are a few holes in your argument.
    You call "sitting in front of you" a phrase, and "seeing an accident ahead" a clause. This anomaly explains how you get a phrase from a clause.

    "2. The boy sitting in front of you is my cousin." Here "sitting in front of you" is participial construction acting adjectivally. That's how you make a participial X equate with an adjectival X.
    It's well-known that a participle can act as an adjective.

    I can't find anything noteworthy about your argument.

  3. #3
    panicmonger is offline Member
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    Post Re: Relative clause = Adjective clause VS participle clause = adverbial clause

    Quote Originally Posted by Raymott View Post
    There are a few holes in your argument.
    You call "sitting in front of you" a phrase, and "seeing an accident ahead" a clause. This anomaly explains how you get a phrase from a clause.
    Actually, can a participial clause(non-finite) acting as adjective be called a phrase? In this case, it is "sitting in front of you".

    According to my book, it states that there are many different types of adjective phrase such as prepositional phrase, participle phrase(non-finite clause).

    In the case of participle construction, participial clause is equal to participial phrase.

    From you reply, I begin to doubt the correctness of my book.

  4. #4
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    Default Re: Relative clause = Adjective clause VS participle clause = adverbial clause

    Quote Originally Posted by panicmonger View Post
    Actually, can a participial clause(non-finite) acting as adjective be called a phrase? In this case, it is "sitting in front of you".

    According to my book, it states that there are many different types of adjective phrase such as prepositional phrase, participle phrase(non-finite clause).

    In the case of participle construction, participial clause is equal to participial phrase.

    From you reply, I begin to doubt the correctness of my book.
    I don't know. When I went to school, a clause had to have a finite verb. "Clause" is used differently by different grammarians.

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