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Thread: rise and raise

  1. Nightmare85's Avatar
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    #1

    rise and raise

    Hello,
    I have problems to see the real difference between these two words.
    As far as I know:
    The sun rises.

    Where do I have to use raise instead of rise?
    Does raise mean I do something?
    I always raise the fun in our classroom.

    Are both blue sentences correct?
    Do you maybe have some examples where I can clearly see the difference?

    I'll try some more examples, though:
    The taxes get raised.
    It may raise a bit aggression.

    Thank you

    Cheers!

  2. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: rise and raise

    If it does it on it's own, it rises.
    If someone acts on it to make it happen, it is raised. Raise will be a transitive verb in all the example I can think of.

    I raise the flag.
    I rise to sing the national anthem.

    Community anger over the issue is rising. (No one is physically making this happen.)
    You raised a good point in your discussion.

    Edit: I seem to remember that what we call self-rising flour in the US is called self-raising flour in the UK, but, but it's a reflexive - it raises itself. This is probably best thought of as an exception.
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

  3. Nightmare85's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: rise and raise

    Quote Originally Posted by Barb_D View Post
    If it does it on its own, it rises.


    Thank you!
    So I see that my guess "raise = you do something" is correct.

    I rise to sing the national anthem.
    Although I understand it, it's a bit difficult.
    In this case I also do something (standing up).
    However, I see why it can't be raise...

    Cheers!

  4. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: rise and raise

    Quote Originally Posted by Nightmare85 View Post


    Thank you!
    So I see that my guess "raise = you do something" is correct.

    I rise to sing the national anthem.
    Although I understand it, it's a bit difficult.
    In this case I also do something (standing up).
    However, I see why it can't be raise...

    Cheers!
    When you "raise" something, you simply make it higher than it was before. "I raise my hand in class to answer the question". "I raised the baby over my head." "I raised my head a little so I could see more."

    When you "rise", you stand up completely with your entire body.

    "Raise" usually needs a direct object, "rise" doesn't.

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    #5

    Exclamation Re: rise and raise

    Quote Originally Posted by Nightmare85 View Post


    Thank you!
    So I see that my guess "raise = you do something" is correct.

    I rise to sing the national anthem.
    Although I understand it, it's a bit difficult.
    In this case I also do something (standing up).
    However, I see why it can't be raise...

    Cheers!
    Raise and rise are similar in form and meaning but different in grammatical use. Raise is the causative of rise; to raise something is to cause it to rise.
    In India, rise is used as noun to mean increase in salary/pay/standard of living; as:
    After implementation of the recommendations of sixth pay commission all categories employees receive a steep rise in salary.

    However, the dictionary says this is BrE. In AmE it is; a person receives a raise in salary.

  5. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: rise and raise

    Quote Originally Posted by sarat_106 View Post
    Raise and rise are similar in form and meaning but different in grammatical use. Raise is the causative of rise; to raise something is to cause it to rise.
    In India, rise is used as noun to mean increase in salary/pay/standard of living; as:
    After implementation of the recommendations of sixth pay commission all categories employees receive a steep rise in salary.

    However, the dictionary says this is BrE. In AmE it is; a person receives a raise in salary.
    Yes, when you are talking about a salary, in BrE you go to your boss and "ask for a raise".

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