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  1. #1
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    May 2005
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    Lightbulb the thorny 'for'

    an excerpt from a news from VOA

    Russian President Vladimir Putin is welcoming leaders from around the world in
    Moscow for 60th anniversary celebrations marking the end of World War II in Europe.

    I'm not sure what role the word for plays here. I know that in Moscow modifies welcoming rather than leaders (by Casiopea's grace). But is it true that Putin is welcoming leaders just to prepare for the celebrations? What logical connection is there? The logical link seems somewhat weak to me.
    Or, if we can replace 'for' with some other words without a lost in meaning, what would they be?

    Many thanks!

  2. #2
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    Dec 2004
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    Default Re: the thorny 'for'

    Quote Originally Posted by peteryoung
    an excerpt from a news from VOA

    Russian President Vladimir Putin is welcoming leaders from around the world in
    Moscow for 60th anniversary celebrations marking the end of World War II in Europe.

    I'm not sure what role the word for plays here. I know that in Moscow modifies welcoming rather than leaders (by Casiopea's grace). But is it true that Putin is welcoming leaders just to prepare for the celebrations? What logical connection is there? The logical link seems somewhat weak to me.
    Or, if we can replace 'for' with some other words without a lost in meaning, what would they be?

    Many thanks!

    The way I read this the word "for" means for the purpose of = he is meeting them in Moscow for the purpose of the celebrations that will be taking place in there.

    Same as in:

    I am going to the store for milk = I am going to the store for the purpose of getting some milk.

  3. #3
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    Default Re: the thorny 'for'

    Really thanks Marylin!! But there's something I'm still a bit unclear about. You said I am going to the store for the purpose of getting some milk. That makes perfect sense to me. But when you say for the purpose of the celebrations, I'm a bit confused. Could you please insert a verb (present participle) between of and the? For instance, maybe it's for the purpose of successfully holding the celebration? I'm extremly grateful

  4. #4
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    Sep 2003
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    Default Re: the thorny 'for'

    Try reducing the sentence to its bare bones, like this,

    Putin is welcoming leaders for celebrations.
    Question: Why is Putin welcoming leaders?
    Answer: The reason is this: for 60th anniversary celebrations. (adverbial phrase)

    'for', a preposition, takes '60th anniversary celebrations' as its object. The entire phrase functions adverbially. That is, 'for. . . .' is the reason.

    Putin is welcoming leaders. Why? To celebrate, of course.

  5. #5
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    May 2005
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    Talking Re: the thorny 'for'

    This is really illuminating. Thank you all !

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
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    Default Re: the thorny 'for'

    You're most welcome, Peter.

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