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  1. #1
    jiaruchan is offline Member
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    Keep you updated/up-to-date.

    updated = up-to-date

    Is that right?


    Thank you.

  2. #2
    TheParser is offline VIP Member
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    Re: Keep you updated/up-to-date.

    Quote Originally Posted by jiaruchan View Post
    updated = up-to-date

    Is that right?


    Thank you.
    ***** NOT A TEACHER *****

    Good morning, jiaruchan.

    (1) I am sure that some persons will soon give you a better answer than mine.

    (2) I do NOT think they are the same -- certainly not in every case.

    (3) For example, I regularly visit a news website.

    (a) It often says: the news was updated five minutes ago.

    (i) That the latest news has just been posted.

    (ii) In other words, to update = to revise; to change; to add.

    (4) Up-to-date means exactly that: something is up (reaches) today's date.

    FATHER: For your 18th birthday, I am going to give you a 1985 Ford automobile.

    SON: Aw, Dad, everyone will laugh at me. I need an up-to-date car.

    (P. S. This is a terrible example, but I think you get the idea.)

    (i) Maybe another word for "up-to-date" is something like "modern" or "contemporary."

    Have a nice day!

  3. #3
    jiaruchan is offline Member
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    Re: Keep you updated/up-to-date.

    Quote Originally Posted by TheParser View Post
    ***** NOT A TEACHER *****

    Good morning, jiaruchan.

    (1) I am sure that some persons will soon give you a better answer than mine.

    (2) I do NOT think they are the same -- certainly not in every case.

    (3) For example, I regularly visit a news website.

    (a) It often says: the news was updated five minutes ago.

    (i) That the latest news has just been posted.

    (ii) In other words, to update = to revise; to change; to add.

    (4) Up-to-date means exactly that: something is up (reaches) today's date.

    FATHER: For your 18th birthday, I am going to give you a 1985 Ford automobile.

    SON: Aw, Dad, everyone will laugh at me. I need an up-to-date car.

    (P. S. This is a terrible example, but I think you get the idea.)

    (i) Maybe another word for "up-to-date" is something like "modern" or "contemporary."

    Have a nice day!
    Very informative. Thank you.
    By the way, I bet you hear 'keep someone updated with what's going on in the world' more often than ' keep someone up-to-date with what's going on in the world', right? Do we actually say 'keep xx up-to-date'?

  4. #4
    TheParser is offline VIP Member
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    Re: Keep you updated/up-to-date.

    Quote Originally Posted by jiaruchan View Post
    Very informative. Thank you.
    By the way, I bet you hear 'keep someone updated with what's going on in the world' more often than ' keep someone up-to-date with what's going on in the world', right? Do we actually say 'keep xx up-to-date'?
    ***** NOT A TEACHER *****

    Hello again.

    (1) Until someone else answers, let me try.

    (2) Your question sent me to three good dictionaries.

    (3) I discovered something that I had completely overlooked:

    update = a verb

    up to date/ up to date = an adjective.

    (4) Here are some examples from the dictionaries (I may have changed them a bit):

    An up-to-date hospital. = modifies "hospital"

    The book will keep you up to date. = modifies "you."

    *****

    The magazine article will update you on the situation. = verb.

    They need to update that book. = verb.

    The TV reporter promised to keep the viewers updated. = past participle used as an adjective??? Modifies "the viewers"?

    *****

    Maybe (a BIG "maybe"), your two sentences mean the same:

    I will keep you updated.

    I will keep you up to date. (But in writing, definitely (?) NO hyphens in this case.)

    Let's see what others say. Please post a similar question if no one else answers. I, too, want to know.

    Have a nice day!

  5. #5
    TheParser is offline VIP Member
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    Re: Keep you updated/up-to-date.

    Quote Originally Posted by jiaruchan View Post
    Very informative. Thank you.
    By the way, I bet you hear 'keep someone updated with what's going on in the world' more often than ' keep someone up-to-date with what's going on in the world', right? Do we actually say 'keep xx up-to-date'?
    ***** NOT A TEACHER*****

    Jiaruchan, I just thought of something else.

    (1) It seems to me that you often use "I will keep you updated" when

    things are happening REALLY, REALLY fast.

    E.g., On the stock market, I need you to keep me updated. The value of stocks can change in a second.

    (2) It seems to be that "This book will keep you up to date on English grammar" means that it will give you the latest changes that have occurred in the last year, for example. Of course, English grammar does not change every second. It often takes decades or centuries for a language to change. So it might be silly to say, "Please keep me updated on English grammar" -- as if it were going to change overnight!!!

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