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  1. #1
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    Default might as well vs. better off

    Hi!
    Could someone clear up for me difference in using "might as well"
    and "better off", if any.

    For instance, would there be any difference if I said "You'll be better
    off if you play ball with him" instead of "You might as well play ball
    with him" ?

  2. #2
    Tdol is offline Editor, UsingEnglish.com
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    Default Re: might as well vs. better off

    'You might as well' isn't the same, IMO; it means 'there's nothing to lose'. It's more negative- you might as well play with him- it probably won't benefit you much, or at all.

  3. #3
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    Default Re: might as well vs. better off

    Can it mean that saying "I'm better off" I imply some benefit for myself, while saying "I might as well..." I imply some benefit for someone else?

  4. #4
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    Default Re: might as well vs. better off

    up

  5. #5
    Tdol is offline Editor, UsingEnglish.com
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    Default Re: might as well vs. better off

    It could, or little if any benefit, but maybe worth a try (might as well).

  6. #6
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    Default Re: might as well vs. better off

    Quote Originally Posted by aaa
    Can it mean that saying "I'm better off" I imply some benefit for myself, while saying "I might as well..." I imply some benefit for someone else?
    This point interests me.
    We can say that "I'm better off alone" and "I'd better be alone" are similar?

  7. #7
    Tdol is offline Editor, UsingEnglish.com
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    Default Re: might as well vs. better off

    I'd be better off alone = I don't need you
    I'm better off alone = I work well alone, but might imply that I don't need assistance- it could be used professionally, but not when breaking with a partner, IMO.
    I'd better be alone = could you go now (my partner's going to be back soon, for example)

  8. #8
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    Default Re: might as well vs. better off

    Quote Originally Posted by tdol
    I'd be better off alone = I don't need you
    I'm better off alone = I work well alone, but might imply that I don't need assistance- it could be used professionally, but not when breaking with a partner, IMO.
    I'd better be alone = could you go now (my partner's going to be back soon, for example)
    Thank you Tdol!

    Just to make sure...
    I'd [would (?)] be better off alone
    I'd [had (?)] better be alone.

  9. #9
    Tdol is offline Editor, UsingEnglish.com
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    Default Re: might as well vs. better off

    I would be better off.
    I had better be alone.

    They're a bit unfair on learners.

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