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Thread: kick off

  1. #1
    dilodi83 is offline Senior Member
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    Default kick off

    What's the meaning of this expression? TO KICK OFF THE COVERS

    I read this expression in a song and in this song the author was saying: I want to make you laugh, mess up the bed with me, kick off the covers...

    Might it mean "to get rid of the blanket" or "to remove, to take the covers/blanket away"?

    Thank you.

  2. #2
    dilodi83 is offline Senior Member
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    Default Re: kick off

    thank you very much for you explanation, but what's the difference among all these expressions?
    1) to kick off the covers
    2) to take away/off the covers
    3) to get rid of the covers
    4) to remove the covers

    You have said that they all mean the same thing, but can I use them in the same context? Or it depends on who I am talking to and if the style is formal or informal?
    Thanks very much in advance for your answer.

  3. #3
    dilodi83 is offline Senior Member
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    Default Re: kick off

    Thank you very much for you explanation, but what's the difference among all these expressions?
    1) to kick off the covers
    2) to take away/off the covers
    3) to get rid of the covers
    4) to remove the covers

    You have said that they all mean the same thing, but can I use them in the same context? Or it depends on who I am talking to and if the style is formal or informal?
    Thanks very much in advance for your answer.

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