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  1. #1
    Anonymous Guest

    Default Pronunciation of "with"

    Hi there,
    I'm German and I don't know how to spell the word 'with' correctly, because I've already heard several possibilities.
    1: with = wif
    2: with = "th" like in thin
    3: with = th = s (but this i think is definitely wrong)
    5: with = th = d
    6: = none of these.

    The best would be to describe the "th".
    Thanx

  2. #2
    Tdol is offline Editor, UsingEnglish.com
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    It's not the same as 'thin'- it's voiced, which means there's a vibration in the throat. It's more like 'this'. 'Wid' is used in some regional varieties, especially black English and 'wiv' is used by many in London.

  3. #3
    RonBee's Avatar
    RonBee is offline Moderator
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    Default Re: Pronunciation of "with"

    Quote Originally Posted by Anonymous
    Hi there,
    I'm German and I don't know how to spell the word 'with' correctly, because I've already heard several possibilities.
    1: with = wif
    2: with = "th" like in thin
    3: with = th = s (but this i think is definitely wrong)
    5: with = th = d
    6: = none of these.

    The best would be to describe the "th".
    Thanx
    I use the second one, pronouncing the th like the th in math or both. Wif is heard sometimes. (It is also considered poor pronunciation.) Expect to hear wid spoken by people from the Bronx, but they also say fadder and mudder. :wink:

    The third possibility might be spoken by someone who has difficulty making the th sound. Of course, that would make with sound like wish.

    :)

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    Quote Originally Posted by tdol
    It's not the same as 'thin'- it's voiced, which means there's a vibration in the throat. It's more like 'this'. 'Wid' is used in some regional varieties, especially black English and 'wiv' is used by many in London.
    Is there really a vibration with "with"?

    I agree with RonBee's comments.
    Iain

  5. #5
    Willbut Guest

    Default

    I'd say it's there sometimes, but not always.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Willbut
    I'd say it's there sometimes, but not always.
    What do you mean "not always"? Why does it change?
    Iain

  7. #7
    Tdol is offline Editor, UsingEnglish.com
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    It seems to me that the faster you say it, the more it picks up its voicing from the 'w' at the beginning. If it is more drawn out, it is less voiced.

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    Thanks, tdol, for the explanation. :)

    Iain

  9. #9
    Tdol is offline Editor, UsingEnglish.com
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    How do you say it?

  10. #10
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    I guess I say it like you. I was confused when you said with is voiced, because the discussion was about th. It's not easy for me to check as I'm sitting in a cybercafe as I type this, but I think the wi is voiced and the final part, th, isn't.

    In Scotland we sometimes don't pronounce the final th, we use either wee or wi.

    Whar yi goin' wi tha'?
    Whar yi gaen wee tha'?

    Iain

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