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  1. #21
    eurekateam is offline Junior Member
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    Default Re: Why "cannot" and not "can not"

    Nice you two!
    Please tell me, have I beed too insulting during this time? I so, I bag you pardon.
    However, thank you for your convenience in answering to me.
    A question: Would you give some information about adverbial modifiers? I have to take the English sintax Exam soon, bur I lack sone info about this subject.
    Thank you!

  2. #22
    Tdol is online now Editor, UsingEnglish.com
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    Default Re: Why "cannot" and not "can not"

    Could you be a bit more specific- an adverbial's basically a phrase that tells us where, when or how.

  3. #23
    eurekateam is offline Junior Member
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    Default Re: Why "cannot" and not "can not"

    According to our teacher of English Grammar, an edverbal modifier is the part of sentence the denotes the sircumstances (denoted by an adverb) in which an something happens (denoted by a verb).

    This is part os English Sintax, as you may know that grammar in general is devided in Morphology and Sintax. In sintax adverbs are studied as adverbial modifiers and are separeted into catedories and are expalined how to be recognized. In my mother language adverbial modifiers are called, translated wordly, "circunstansers"

    That is what I whant info about.

    Thank you!

  4. #24
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    Default Re: Why "cannot" and not "can not"

    Adverbs, as MM states, answer the question when, where, why, and how. For example.

    Max and Pat were late for work, so they ate their dinner quickly in the car.

    Where? In the car (adverb of place)
    When? At 6:00 (adverb of time)
    Why? because they were late for work (adverb of purpose/circumstance)
    How? quickly. They ate quickly (adverb of manner)

    An adverb can be a single word, like "quickly" or it can be more than one word, like "In the car".

    Please see my suggested corrections below:

    Quote Originally Posted by eurekateam
    Nice to see you too!
    Please tell me, have I been too insulting during this time? If so, I beg you pardon.
    However, thank you for answering my questions so quickly.
    A question: Would you give me some information about adverbial modifiers? I have to take an English syntax exam soon, bur I lack info about this subject.
    Thank you!

  5. #25
    eurekateam is offline Junior Member
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    Default Re: Why "cannot" and not "can not"

    Thank you about the suggestions. They were helpful.
    See you soon!

  6. #26
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    Default Re: Why "cannot" and not "can not"

    You're welcome.

  7. #27
    eurekateam is offline Junior Member
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    Default Re: Why "cannot" and not "can not"

    Hi!
    A have a problem with an adjective. I came accros "hounting Diana" and can not destinguish it from "hounted Diana". Could you give me the difference bettwen the two, please!
    Bye!

  8. #28
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    Default Re: Why "cannot" and not "can not"

    "hounting Diana"? Hmm. Do you mean, "hunting"? If so, -ing words express an ongoing event. For example, they are hunting Diana; They are constantly following her.

    By the way, try
    . . . and cannot distinguish . . . .

    Note, "cannot" is one word in that context.

  9. #29
    eurekateam is offline Junior Member
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    Default Re: Why "cannot" and not "can not"

    Thank you for the reply!
    As a matter of fact, I meant “haunting” with “hounting”, not “hunting”. I you can, please reply the previous question with the help of the added info.
    Another thing; what did you mean with “ one word in this context"? Who is it so?
    Bye!

  10. #30
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    Default Re: Why "cannot" and not "can not"

    You're welcome.

    Quote Originally Posted by eurekateam
    Another thing; what did you mean with one word in this context"? Who is it so?
    Bye!
    "that context" is below. The underlined words should be one single word, like this, "cannot",

    A have a problem with an adjective. I came accros "hounting Diana" and can not destinguish it from "hounted Diana". Could you give me the difference bettwen the two, please!

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