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  1. #1
    TheParser is offline VIP Member
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    Default Please Reed-Kellogg "MORE"

    A member recently posted this sentence:

    It was more of a mistake than a crime.

    Would you please draw a diagram for me?

    In particular, I am interested in the role of "more."

    Thank you VERY much.

  2. #2
    Frank Antonson's Avatar
    Frank Antonson is offline Senior Member
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    Default Re: Please Reed-Kellogg "MORE"


  3. #3
    TheParser is offline VIP Member
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    Default Re: Please Reed-Kellogg "MORE"

    Quote Originally Posted by Frank Antonson View Post
    Thanks SO much.

  4. #4
    Frank Antonson's Avatar
    Frank Antonson is offline Senior Member
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    Default Re: Please Reed-Kellogg "MORE"

    There are quite a few indefinite pronouns. People usually think of the personal pronouns and forget the others.

    I made up a chart (which can be found on the following webpage

    Official Site for Competitive Sentence Diagramming ;) - Home on which they are organized.

    Frank

  5. #5
    chester_100's Avatar
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    Default Re: Please Reed-Kellogg "MORE"

    It's an interesting issue, because diagramming expressions and idioms may be challenging sometimes; mostly because they don't follow the usual grammatical patterns.

    To be more of sth than sth is a fixed expression. Something like a formula. Like Frank, I believe it's a pronoun. Through simplification of structures, we can analyze them:
    1. If more occurs right before an adjective, it should be an adverb of degree.
    2. In your example, however, it's followed by a preposition:
    -Dr. James from X university.
    -The door of the class.
    These examples clearly show that the position occupied by a word before a preposition should be a NP (noun phrase).

    Since more is not a noun, it should be pronoun. This technique is referred to as analogy. Of course, we must be very watchful not to make false analogies:
    -He took the ball perfectlyfrom John.
    The occurrence of the adverb before the preposition in this sentence shouldn't confuse us.

    Good luck

  6. #6
    corum is offline Banned
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    Default Re: Please Reed-Kellogg "MORE"

    Quote Originally Posted by Frank Antonson View Post

  7. #7
    oves is offline Newbie
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    Default Re: Please Reed-Kellogg "MORE"

    Quote Originally Posted by chester_100 View Post
    It's an interesting issue, because diagramming expressions and idioms may be challenging sometimes; mostly because they don't follow the usual grammatical patterns.

    To be more of sth than sth is a fixed expression. Something like a formula. Like Frank, I believe it's a pronoun. Through simplification of structures, we can analyze them:
    1. If more occurs right before an adjective, it should be an adverb of degree.
    2. In your example, however, it's followed by a preposition:
    -Dr. James from X university.
    -The door of the class.
    These examples clearly show that the position occupied by a word before a preposition should be a NP (noun phrase).

    Since more is not a noun, it should be pronoun. This technique is referred to as analogy. Of course, we must be very watchful not to make false analogies:
    -He took the ball perfectlyfrom John.
    The occurrence of the adverb before the preposition in this sentence shouldn't confuse us.

    Good luck
    Hallo,
    Can I ask If I understand correctly?

    "It was more of a mistake than a crime" is similar to " It was rather a mistake than a crime".

    This expression is very interesting and I would like to know if there is a book with fixed expressions.

    Thanks
    Last edited by oves; 15-Jun-2010 at 08:52.

  8. #8
    Frank Antonson's Avatar
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    Default Re: Please Reed-Kellogg "MORE"

    Those two sentences are not that similar because "rather" cannot stand on its own a a pronoun. You could stop the sentence as "It was more."

    Off hand, I am not sure what to do with your "rather" sentence.

    I'll have to think. Anyone want to go first?

  9. #9
    oves is offline Newbie
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    Default Re: Please Reed-Kellogg "MORE"

    And would it be OK to say?

    It was a mistake rather than a crime.

    Is it also OK to say?

    It was more a mistake than a crime.


    Thanks

  10. #10
    Frank Antonson's Avatar
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    Default Re: Please Reed-Kellogg "MORE"

    For your first example --It was rather a mistake than a crime. -- I think you could substitute "It was a mistake instead of a crime". Then "instead of" would simply be a phrasal preposition. May "rather...than" could be considered as a correlative preposition. I am not sure if I have ever heard of such a thing, but it seems like it could work.

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