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  1. #1
    Wolfespepe Guest

    From Caxton's "Game and Playe of the Chess"

    "Thenne late" has got me confused of the Sentence "Thenne late euery man of what condicion he be...

  2. #2
    BobK's Avatar
    BobK is offline Harmless drudge
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    Re: From Caxton's "Game and Playe of the Chess"

    Quote Originally Posted by Wolfespepe View Post
    "Thenne late" has got me confused of the Sentence "Thenne late euery man of what condicion he be...
    'Then [probably, depending on context. = 'so'] let everyone, regardless of status...'. We use 'condition' today more to refer to physical condition (a person might be 'fit', a book might be 'dog-eared'...), but Caxton (and his contemporaries) used it to refer to social standing.

    The typesetter, in writing 'late' for 'let' was probable betraying his local dialect; but in fact, as this dates from the period of the Great Vowel Shift (about 200 years of chaos) there was no guessing what he'd put.

    b
    Last edited by BobK; 21-May-2010 at 14:37. Reason: Fix typo

  3. #3
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    Re: From Caxton's "Game and Playe of the Chess"

    Thankyou BobK for a succinct and correct answer...it put me on the right track Re:Thenne "late" euery man...Yes, late=let.
    from "leten" to let [ME] Then back to [Old English] laeten(lŠten)to allow,let....Then the conjuguation of laeten in the subjunctive was my elusive "late"meaning let ....:) Thanks again,I was too fixated on "late" being "of late(edition)" to see the forest for the trees...

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