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Thread: at the latest

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    #1

    at the latest

    He hould make a decision at the latest at the beginning of 2011.

    He should make a decision at the beginning of 2011 at the latest.

    Which sentence is better?

    Thanks.

  1. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: at the latest

    Quote Originally Posted by Jasmin165 View Post
    He should make a decision at the latest at the beginning of 2011.

    He should make a decision at the beginning of 2011 at the latest.

    Which sentence is better?

    Thanks.
    Sentence 2 is better.

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    #3

    Re: at the latest

    Quote Originally Posted by Jasmin165 View Post
    He hould make a decision at the latest at the beginning of 2011.

    He should make a decision at the beginning of 2011 at the latest.

    Which sentence is better?

    Thanks.
    You would say 'by' not 'at'
    Bertie

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    #4

    Re: at the latest

    Quote Originally Posted by bertietheblue View Post
    Bertie
    I think both are correct, and there's a slight difference between "at the beginning of 2011" and "by the beginning of 2011."

    I'll hand in the assignment by the beginning of March. = I'll hand in the assignment before the beginning of March.

    I'll hand in the assignment at the beginning of March. = I'll hand in the assignment during the first week or two of March.

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    #5

    Re: at the latest

    Completely true but your sentence contains 'at the latest'. In this case, you're talking about any time upto a fixed point (not defined), aren't you? If so, 'by'. Would you be more likely to say:

    'I'll be there at 6 at the latest'

    or

    'I'll be there by 6 at the latest'?

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    #6

    Re: at the latest

    There is another reason why 'at' is not the best choice here:

    'He should make a decision at the beginning of 2011 at the latest' - the emphasis here is making a decision 'at the beginning' but whether it's made at the beginning or some time before the beginning is irrelevant; what is relevant is that, you guessed it, it's made 'by' the beginning.

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    #7

    Re: at the latest

    Quote Originally Posted by bertietheblue View Post
    Completely true but your sentence contains 'at the latest'. In this case, you're talking about any time upto a fixed point (not defined), aren't you? If so, 'by'. Would you be more likely to say:

    'I'll be there at 6 at the latest'

    or

    'I'll be there by 6 at the latest'?
    In my opinion, "I'll be there by 6" would cover the unspoken "at the latest" making it unrequired.

    I would say "I'll be there at 6 at the latest".

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    #8

    Re: at the latest

    'at the latest' isn't redundant - it underlines that you won't go over that point. I still maintain that it is better to say:

    by 6pm at the latest

    or

    by no later than 6pm

    In the context of my work, I've certainly never seen 'this document must be signed on 31 December, 2010 at the latest'. The 'on' isn't important; the 'by' is.

    Anybody else's opinion or a poll ?

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    #9

    Re: at the latest

    I've asked a few colleagues and for what it's worth there's a pretty even split between:

    I'll be back at 6 at the latest

    and

    I'll be back by 6 at the latest

    So maybe I was wrong to say 'I'll be back by 6 at the latest' is preferable. Maybe it's either, or with a slight difference in emphasis. However, when it comes to the original sentence that was queried there's a unanimous 'by' from my colleagues. I've given my arguments why that might be - does anybody else care to disagree or comment?

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