Results 1 to 10 of 10

Thread: southern card

  1. #1
    maiabulela is offline Senior Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Other
      • Native Language:
      • Arabic
      • Home Country:
      • Egypt
      • Current Location:
      • Egypt
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Posts
    1,050
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default southern card

    In a restaurant where a middle-eatern cook is doing the southern classic recepie his way, one of the people eating there saying:

    "This is better than (Hoppin John), I'm gonna get my southern card taken away from me."

    What does that mean? I have found many results in google, on of them were in a context a bout food too but i haven't got it"

    Thanks.

  2. #2
    maiabulela is offline Senior Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Other
      • Native Language:
      • Arabic
      • Home Country:
      • Egypt
      • Current Location:
      • Egypt
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Posts
    1,050
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: southern card

    Who said that was not the cook, but it was said by one of the visitors. So I got that it is a joke but i'd be gratel if u profided more ex[alantion coz it's not clear.
    Thanks.

  3. #3
    maiabulela is offline Senior Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Other
      • Native Language:
      • Arabic
      • Home Country:
      • Egypt
      • Current Location:
      • Egypt
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Posts
    1,050
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: southern card

    This is clear enough

  4. #4
    BobK's Avatar
    BobK is offline Harmless drudge
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • UK
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Posts
    15,665
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: southern card

    Or it could be another type of metaphorical card - the sort that gives you a competitive edge in any situation. Someone who has lost his parents (for example), and tries to cash in on his status, can be said to be 'playing the orphan card'.

    By this interpretation, the speaker's 'southern card' is the status of being the person known for their southern cookery. If someone else has cooked a southern dish that is thought to be better, the speaker might lose that recognition.

    (But I know nothing about Tex-Mex cooking, and will happily defer to higher authority )

    b

  5. #5
    Barb_D's Avatar
    Barb_D is offline Moderator
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Other
      • Native Language:
      • American English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Posts
    17,392
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: southern card

    Oh, Bob, Bob, Bob... we have to get you here from some fried chicken, fried okra, fried something else, with some collard greens, black-eyed peas, and grits so you can learn the difference between Southern cooking and Tex-Mex.
    Last edited by Barb_D; 28-May-2010 at 17:50.
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

  6. #6
    Ouisch's Avatar
    Ouisch is offline Moderator
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Posts
    4,142
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: southern card

    Quote Originally Posted by maiabulela View Post
    In a restaurant where a middle-eatern cook is doing the southern classic recepie his way, one of the people eating there saying:

    "This is better than (Hoppin John), I'm gonna get my southern card taken away from me."

    What does that mean? I have found many results in google, on of them were in a context a bout food too but i haven't got it"

    Thanks.

    The person speaking is from the American South, where Hoppin' John is a specialty dish. In your scenario he has tasted a Middle-Eastern rice dish that, to him, is even more delicious than his cherished Hoppin' John. But he (humorously) worries about praising the Middle Eastern dish, fearing that he'll be "stripped" of his Southern credentials. ("Southern card" is just a metaphor for someone who hails from the South and is proud of it - it implies that he carries a "membership" card that confirms his Southern identity.)

    Another example: My husband was born and raised in the American South. When we first started dating (he had moved to the North, where I lived), several people giggled whenever he would say the word "pecan," because he pronounced it "PEE-can," whereas we all pronounce it "pi-CAHN." So he started saying "pi-CAHN" in order to fit in with the rest of us. When we went back to Georgia to visit his parents he happened to ask about Grandpa's pecan ("pi-CAHN") trees. Well, you should have seen how his mom, dad and brothers all literally froze for a second with eyes wide when he said that. His father then asked "What did you say, boy?" Mr. Ouisch looked sheepishly at his feet and quietly repeated "pi-CAHN." His family all looked disgusted and his dad muttered "She's turning him into a Yankee..." Mr. Ouisch felt at that moment that he had relinquished his "Southern card."

  7. #7
    maiabulela is offline Senior Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Other
      • Native Language:
      • Arabic
      • Home Country:
      • Egypt
      • Current Location:
      • Egypt
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Posts
    1,050
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: southern card

    Quote Originally Posted by Ouisch View Post
    The person speaking is from the American South, where Hoppin' John is a specialty dish. In your scenario he has tasted a Middle-Eastern rice dish that, to him, is even more delicious than his cherished Hoppin' John. But he (humorously) worries about praising the Middle Eastern dish, fearing that he'll be "stripped" of his Southern credentials. ("Southern card" is just a metaphor for someone who hails from the South and is proud of it - it implies that he carries a "membership" card that confirms his Southern identity.)

    Another example: My husband was born and raised in the American South. When we first started dating (he had moved to the North, where I lived), several people giggled whenever he would say the word "pecan," because he pronounced it "PEE-can," whereas we all pronounce it "pi-CAHN." So he started saying "pi-CAHN" in order to fit in with the rest of us. When we went back to Georgia to visit his parents he happened to ask about Grandpa's pecan ("pi-CAHN") trees. Well, you should have seen how his mom, dad and brothers all literally froze for a second with eyes wide when he said that. His father then asked "What did you say, boy?" Mr. Ouisch looked sheepishly at his feet and quietly repeated "pi-CAHN." His family all looked disgusted and his dad muttered "She's turning him into a Yankee..." Mr. Ouisch felt at that moment that he had relinquished his "Southern card."
    I really can't thank you enough!!! You really helped me with this word "stripped". Thanks a lot. The other example that you kindly provided is amazing and even makes it clearer.

  8. #8
    Tdol is offline Editor, UsingEnglish.com
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • Japan
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Posts
    43,580
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: southern card

    Quote Originally Posted by Ouisch View Post
    Another example: My husband was born and raised in the American South. When we first started dating (he had moved to the North, where I lived), several people giggled whenever he would say the word "pecan," because he pronounced it "PEE-can," whereas we all pronounce it "pi-CAHN."
    I say PEE-can; do I get an honorary Southern card?

  9. #9
    Ouisch's Avatar
    Ouisch is offline Moderator
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Posts
    4,142
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: southern card

    Quote Originally Posted by Tdol View Post
    I say PEE-can; do I get an honorary Southern card?
    LOL Yes, indeed. Now all you have to do is develop a taste for grits.

  10. #10
    Barb_D's Avatar
    Barb_D is offline Moderator
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Other
      • Native Language:
      • American English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Posts
    17,392
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: southern card

    (But I will never like okra.)
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

Similar Threads

  1. Credit Card Cancallation Letter
    By dhara in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 23-Mar-2009, 04:38
  2. I lost my punch card
    By charchita in forum Editing & Writing Topics
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 28-May-2008, 00:22
  3. Replies: 2
    Last Post: 18-Dec-2007, 23:50
  4. Return my Southern Accent
    By Southern Belle in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 05-Aug-2007, 05:31
  5. a credit card / credit card(s)
    By Itasan in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 15-Aug-2005, 05:40

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •