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    #1

    running and runny nose, I think, ask for leave

    Dear teachers,

    I have two questions:

    No.1
    I get confused by "running nose " and "runny nose". Please read the following sentences:
    Yesterday I had a runny nose.
    Yesterday I had a running nose.

    No.2
    I don't think I can do it.
    I think I can't do it.
    Could you please explain if both of the two structures correct? And is there any difference in meaning?

    No.3
    If I am ill I have to ask for a sick leave. And if I need to leave the place where I work then I should ask for a leave. Is that right? Or is there an expression like "to ask for a casual leave of absence"?


    Looking forward to hearing from you.
    Thank you in advance.

    Jiang

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      • English Teacher
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    #2

    Re: running and runny nose, I think, ask for leave

    1 http://www.usingenglish.com/forum/as...ning-nose.html
    2 It depends- there may be differences in the degree of certainty- the second sounds less likely, but intonation and context could change that.
    3 ask for sick leave (no article). The second part depends on the reason you're leaving.

  1. Raymott's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: running and runny nose, I think, ask for leave

    Quote Originally Posted by jiang View Post
    No.2
    I don't think I can do it.
    I think I can't do it.
    Could you please explain if both of the two structures correct? And is there any difference in meaning?
    They both mean "I think that I can't do it". However, in most phrases like this, they are usually expressed in English like "I don't think I can do it". That is, with negatives, we strangely negate the first verb rather than the second.
    Instead of "I think not-X", we say, "I don't think X".

    This happens with some other verbs.
    "I don't believe that's true" generally means "I do believe that's not true."
    "I don't want you to come" means "I want you not to come."

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      • Interested in Language
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    #4

    Re: running and runny nose, I think, ask for leave

    Quote Originally Posted by jiang View Post
    Yesterday I had a running nose.

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