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  1. #1
    uktous is offline Senior Member
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    Default I have a good knowledge in these disciplines/fields/areas

    Hi,

    Question:
    Could you please suggest some suitable words for my sentence?

    Sentence:
    I specialised in marketing and finance&accounting when I read for my MSc, so I have a good knowledge in these xxxxx .



    My opinion:
    disciplines , fields and areas are ok.
    any other?

    Thanks

  2. #2
    Raymott's Avatar
    Raymott is offline VIP Member
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    Default Re: I have a good knowledge in these disciplines/fields/areas

    Quote Originally Posted by uktous View Post
    Hi,

    Question:
    Could you please suggest some suitable words for my sentence?

    Sentence:
    I specialised in marketing and finance&accounting when I read for my MSc, so I have a good knowledge in these xxxxx .


    My opinion:
    disciplines , fields and areas are ok.
    any other?

    Thanks
    Any of those is suitable. You could even end your sentence at 'these'.
    Do they still use 'read' in UK to mean study?

  3. #3
    uktous is offline Senior Member
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    Default Re: I have a good knowledge in these disciplines/fields/areas

    Quote Originally Posted by Raymott View Post
    Any of those is suitable. You could even end your sentence at 'these'.
    Do they still use 'read' in UK to mean study?

    Hi,

    I am not familiar with the word "read".

    But according to this dictionary, I think it is fine.
    Definition of read verb (STUDY) from Cambridge Dictionary Online: Free English Dictionary and Thesaurus




    [I or T] UK formal to study at university or to study for a specialized
    qualification

    They're both reading history at Cambridge.

    She's reading
    for the Bar (= studying to become a type of lawyer called a barrister).

  4. #4
    Raymott's Avatar
    Raymott is offline VIP Member
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    Default Re: I have a good knowledge in these disciplines/fields/areas

    Quote Originally Posted by uktous View Post
    Hi,

    I am not familiar with the word "read".

    But according to this dictionary, I think it is fine.
    Definition of read verb (STUDY) from Cambridge Dictionary Online: Free English Dictionary and Thesaurus
    Yes. I know it's in the dictionary. It just sounds quaint. I'd advise "study" unless you hang around with a crowd that says 'read' in this context.

  5. #5
    uktous is offline Senior Member
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    Default Re: I have a good knowledge in these disciplines/fields/areas

    Quote Originally Posted by Raymott View Post
    Yes. I know it's in the dictionary. It just sounds quaint. I'd advise "study" unless you hang around with a crowd that says 'read' in this context.
    Hi,

    If I use "study", do I need the word "degree" ???


    Ie,
    when I studied for my MSc, .....
    when I studied for my MSc degree ......
    when I studied for my MSc's degree ......

    Thanks

  6. #6
    bertietheblue is offline Senior Member
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    Default Re: I have a good knowledge in these disciplines/fields/areas

    Quote Originally Posted by uktous View Post
    Hi,

    Question:
    Could you please suggest some suitable words for my sentence?

    Sentence:
    I specialised in marketing and finance&accounting when I read for my MSc, so I have a good knowledge in these xxxxx .



    My opinion:
    disciplines , fields and areas are ok.
    any other?

    Thanks
    From the Oxford English Dictionary: 'discipline - a branch of knowledge, typically one studied in higher education'.

    Unless you want to emphasise the theoretical knowledge of the lecture room, rather than the practical knowledge of work, leave 'discipline' behind you. You would never hear a marketing director say, 'I have good knowledge in the discipline of marketing.'

    Also, from my experience of proofreading CVs written by people in business, there is a clear preference for 'wide knowledge' or 'in-depth knowledge' (each, slightly different in meaning to the other) - I rarely see 'good knowledge'. I think this preference for 'wide' and 'in-depth' is in part so they can combine 'knowledge' with 'experience': 'I have wide/in-depth knowledge and experience in the field of ...'

  7. #7
    bertietheblue is offline Senior Member
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    Default Re: I have a good knowledge in these disciplines/fields/areas

    Quote Originally Posted by uktous View Post
    Hi,

    If I use "study", do I need the word "degree" ???


    Ie,
    when I studied for my MSc, .....
    when I studied for my MSc degree ......
    when I studied for my MSc's degree ......

    Thanks
    I would put 'degree' in if writing formally (note: 'MSc degree' and not 'MSc's degree') because, well, this is more formal and also because you cannot be sure that the person reading your letter knows what an MSc is - they might not be a UK native. Informally, either, or is OK though most people would drop the 'degree' when talking to another British person, especially if they thought that other person had been in higher education and so would understand BA/MA/BSc/MSc.

  8. #8
    Raymott's Avatar
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    Default Re: I have a good knowledge in these disciplines/fields/areas

    I agree to no 'degree'.

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