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    michael281001 is offline Junior Member
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    Default Question regarding the usage of the words disproportionate and ratio.

    Questions regarding disproportionate and ratio.

    a) The amount of bread flour is disproportionate to the amount of pastry flour, which mean one kind of flour is more than the other kind of flour in the recipe.
    b) The ratio of the bread flour and the pastry flour is incorrect, which mean one kind of flour is more than the other kind of flour.

    *Something is more than the other in something.
    Is this the defination of disproportianate or incommensurate?

    Example:
    One kind of flour is more than the other kind of flour.

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    Raymott is offline VIP Member
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    Default Re: Question regarding the usage of the words disproportionate and ratio.

    Quote Originally Posted by michael281001 View Post
    Questions regarding disproportionate and ratio.

    a) The amount of bread flour is disproportionate to the amount of pastry flour, which mean one kind of flour is more than the other kind of flour in the recipe.
    b) The ratio of the bread flour and the to pastry flour is incorrect, which mean one kind of flour is more than the other kind of flour.

    In both cases, it doesn't mean that there is a difference in the amount. It means that the proportions are wrong.
    If the recipe calls for two parts of bread flour to one part of pastry flour then, if there are equal amounts, the amounts are still disproportionate.

    *Something is more than the other in something.
    No, something is more than it should be in comparison with the other.

    Is this the defination of disproportianate or incommensurate?
    'Incommensurate' is one definition of 'disproportionate'. It's not as commonly used.
    Example:
    One kind of flour is more than the other kind of flour.
    R.

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