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  1. #1
    Atchan is offline Key Member
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    10 Sentences (2)

    Please fix these sentences as possible.

    Present Perfect Tense
    A thieve has escaped from a jail, and policemen have still looked about him.
    Passive Tense (Present Perfect Tense)
    A jail has been escaped from by a thieve, and policemen have still looked about him.

    Present continuous Perfect Tense
    My mother has been hearing the baby cry, since it born.
    Passive Tense (Present continuous Perfect Tense)
    A baby cry has been hearing by my mother, since it born.

    Past Perfect Tense
    After we had eaten the dinner, my mam was ladling out soup for us.
    Passive Tense (Past Perfect Tense)
    After the dinner had been eaten by us, my mam was ladling out soup for us.

    Past Continuous Perfect Tense
    When my friend was a fat, he had been jogging around the track.
    Passive Tense (Past Continuous Perfect Tense)
    When my friend was a fat, the track had been jogged around by him.

    Future Continuous Tense
    By the time the ski rain, one room of our room’s roof will be leaking.
    Passive Tense (Future Continuous Tense)
    By the time the ski is rained, one room of our room’s roof will be leaking.
    Last edited by Atchan; 07-Jun-2010 at 23:10.

  2. #2
    Atchan is offline Key Member
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    Re: 10 Sentences (2)

    Where are you teachers....

  3. #3
    ~Mav~ is offline Member
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    Post Re: 10 Sentences (2)

    *** NEITHER A NATIVE ENGLISH SPEAKER (and it hurts ), NOR A TEACHER ***


    Quote Originally Posted by atchan View Post

    Present Perfect Tense
    A thieve has escaped from a jail, and policemen have still looked about him.
    Passive Tense (Present Perfect Tense)
    a) Thieve is a verb, it means "to steal". Those who commit theft are thieves, one of them is a thief. (Thief = singular, thieves = plural, to thieve = to steal)

    b) A thief has escaped from a jail, and policemen (or the police) are still chasing him.


    Quote Originally Posted by atchan View Post
    A jail has been escaped from by a thieve, and policemen have still looked about him.
    This doesn't make sense. I know what you wanted to say, but you had better stick to the previous version. (Alternatively you can say: An escaped criminal has been chased by the police since this morning.)


    Quote Originally Posted by atchan View Post
    My mother has been hearing the baby cry, since it born.
    ...(ever) since s/he was born. (Given that you wrote "my mother", I assume you know the gender of the baby. )
    //Though this sentence seems to be grammatically correct, I find it kind of awkward.


    Quote Originally Posted by atchan View Post
    A baby cry has been hearing by my mother, since it born.
    "...has been heard..", but I wouldn't push the passive here.


    Quote Originally Posted by atchan View Post
    After we had eaten the dinner, my mam (mum, mummy) was ladling out soup for us.
    This is a grammatically correct sentence (as much as I can judge it), but "after" makes the use of Past Perfect unnecessary, and I wouldn't use "ladling", because I presume it didn't take hours. (Though I might be wrong, of course.)


    Quote Originally Posted by atchan View Post
    After the dinner had been eaten by us...
    Oh no! But there could be an even worse sentence: After the dinner had been being eaten...

    Quote Originally Posted by atchan View Post
    When my friend was a fat, he had been jogging around the track.
    When my friend was fat, he used to jog around the track in order to lose weight. Do not want to use the Past Perfect, because your friend's habit of jogging doesn't seem to precede his state of fatness, especially according to "when" with which you introduced this sentence.


    Quote Originally Posted by atchan View Post
    When my friend was a fat, the track had been jogged around by him.
    Do yourself a favour, and forget this!

    Quote Originally Posted by atchan View Post
    By the time the ski rain, one room of our room’s roof will be leaking.
    Passive Tense (Future Continuous Tense)
    By the time the ski is rained, one room of our room’s roof will be leaking.
    Sowwie, I didn't get it.



    I hope I could help you a little and didn't write rubbish.

  4. #4
    TheParser is offline VIP Member
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    Re: 10 Sentences (2)

    Quote Originally Posted by atchan View Post
    Please fix these sentences as possible.

    Present Perfect Tense
    A thieve has escaped from a jail, and policemen have still looked about him.
    Passive Tense (Present Perfect Tense)
    A jail has been escaped from by a thieve, and policemen have still looked about him.

    Present continuous Perfect Tense
    My mother has been hearing the baby cry, since it born.
    Passive Tense (Present continuous Perfect Tense)
    A baby cry has been hearing by my mother, since it born.

    Past Perfect Tense
    After we had eaten the dinner, my mam was ladling out soup for us.
    Passive Tense (Past Perfect Tense)
    After the dinner had been eaten by us, my mam was ladling out soup for us.

    Past Continuous Perfect Tense
    When my friend was a fat, he had been jogging around the track.
    Passive Tense (Past Continuous Perfect Tense)
    When my friend was a fat, the track had been jogged around by him.

    Future Continuous Tense
    By the time the ski rain, one room of our room’s roof will be leaking.
    Passive Tense (Future Continuous Tense)
    By the time the ski is rained, one room of our room’s roof will be leaking.

    ***** NOT A TEACHER *****

    Good afternoon, Atchan.

    (1) I have discovered that people will get more and faster answers if they post only one question at a time.

    (2) I have read all your sentences, and I believe that there is one basic problem: many of them CANNOT be changed to the passive.

    (a) Basically, you usually need an object if you wish to change a sentence to the passive:

    I study English. "English" is the object. So: English is studied by me.

    *****

    Let's look at your first sentence:

    A thief has escaped from jail, and the police are looking for him.

    (a) A thief + has escaped + NO OBJECT. Therefore, the passive is not possible.

    (i) A thief has stolen my money. "My money" is the object. So: My money has been stolen by a thief.

    *****

    My mother has been hearing the crying baby.

    (a) Yes, there IS an object (the crying baby).

    (b) Yes, the passive IS possible:

    The crying baby has been being heard by my mother.

    BUT!!!!!!

    This passive is only good for practicing English. Native speakers never use it because it sounds too strange.

    *****

    Your third sentence is not clear:

    I. We ate dinner.
    2. Then Mother ladled out soup.
    3. Mother ladled out soup after we had eaten dinner? I do not understand. Why did Mother give us soup AFTER dinner? Is that a custom in some countries? In the U.S.A., we START dinner with a soup and end it with a dessert.

    But your passive is 100% correct: After dinner had been eaten by us, ...

    *****

    Do you mean:

    Because he was fat, my friend had been jogging around the track.

    In any case, "around the track" is not an object, so it cannot be changed to the passive.

    *****

    When the rain starts, the roof on one of our rooms will be leaking water.

    (a) Yes, there's an object ("water").

    (b) Yes, the books say that it is "good" English to say:

    Water will be being leaked

    BUT!!!!

    Native speakers almost NEVER use this. It sounds "strange."

    Remember: native speakers almost never use the passive in the future progressive and in the perfect progressives.

    You have done a very good job. Keep studying hard, and you will soon be speaking very good English.

    Have a nice day!

  5. #5
    Atchan is offline Key Member
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    Re: 10 Sentences (2)

    first of all thank you, secondly, Do you mean that some of my sentences don't need "Passive Tense".

    Originally Posted by atchan
    After the dinner had been eaten by us...

    Oh no! But there could be an even worse sentence: After the dinner had been being eaten...

    Originally Posted by atchan
    By the time the ski rain, one room of our room’s roof will be leaking.
    Passive Tense (Future Continuous Tense)
    By the time the ski is rained, one room of our room’s roof will be leaking.

    Sowwie, I didn't get it.

  6. #6
    Atchan is offline Key Member
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    Re: 10 Sentences (2)

    One question..

    If there isn't an object in a sentence, that means it will not be changed to Passive Tense?
    Last edited by Atchan; 08-Jun-2010 at 01:13.

  7. #7
    TheParser is offline VIP Member
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    Re: 10 Sentences (2)

    Quote Originally Posted by atchan View Post
    One question..

    If there isn't an object in a sentence, that means it will be changed to Passive Tense?
    ***** NOT A TEACHER *****

    Hello again.

    If there is no object, that USUALLY means that it CANNOT be changed to the passive.

    Of course, every language has exceptions:

    Everybody laughed at him.

    Everybody + laughed + NO OBJECT

    BUT!!!!

    You CAN change this to the passive:

    He was laughed at (by everyone).

    *****

    For learners, however, it is better to remember the rule:

    You USUALLY need an object if you want to change it to the passive. If

    there is NO object, do NOT try to change it to the passive.

    Don't worry!

    Keep studying and keep on asking questions. Soon you will understand.

    Have a nice day!

  8. #8
    Atchan is offline Key Member
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    Re: 10 Sentences (2)

    Quote Originally Posted by TheParser View Post
    ***** NOT A TEACHER *****

    Hello again.

    If there is no object, that USUALLY means that it CANNOT be changed to the passive.

    Of course, every language has exceptions:

    Everybody laughed at him.

    Everybody + laughed + NO OBJECT

    BUT!!!!

    You CAN change this to the passive:

    He was laughed at (by everyone).

    *****

    For learners, however, it is better to remember the rule:

    You USUALLY need an object if you want to change it to the passive. If

    there is NO object, do NOT try to change it to the passive.

    Don't worry!

    Keep studying and keep on asking questions. Soon you will understand.

    Have a nice day!
    Good advises, I will keep on.
    Thank you so much, you are helpful.

  9. #9
    Nightmare85's Avatar
    Nightmare85 is offline Senior Member
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    Re: 10 Sentences (2)

    Quote Originally Posted by TheParser View Post
    Everybody laughed at him.

    Everybody + laughed + NO OBJECT
    Hello TheParser,

    Why do you think there is no object?
    To me "him" looks like an object.
    I don't think it's a complement.
    Everybody helped him.
    Everybody laughed at him.

    I like him.
    In all these sentences him looks like an object to me.

    I believe there is no object here:
    I'm not like he. (Most guys would say "him").

    P.S. It's only a question, I don't have doubts because, don't worry

    Cheers!

  10. #10
    TheParser is offline VIP Member
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    Re: 10 Sentences (2)

    Quote Originally Posted by Nightmare85 View Post
    Hello TheParser,

    Why do you think there is no object?
    To me "him" looks like an object.
    I don't think it's a complement.
    Everybody helped him.
    Everybody laughed at him.
    I like him.
    In all these sentences him looks like an object to me.

    I believe there is no object here:
    I'm not like he. (Most guys would say "him").

    P.S. It's only a question, I don't have doubts because, don't worry



    Cheers!
    Thanks for your great question. I have to leave now. I'll try to answer tomorrow. Or maybe someone else will answer before I do. Have a nice day!

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