Results 1 to 4 of 4
  1. #1
    enydia is offline Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Posts
    414
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default The more I know the less I understand

    Is it a cliche?

    What is the alternative if I want to describe one's feeling when he/she is doing research in some field?

  2. #2
    Raymott's Avatar
    Raymott is offline VIP Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Academic
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • Australia
      • Current Location:
      • Australia
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Posts
    19,527
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: The more I know the less I understand

    Quote Originally Posted by enydia View Post
    Is it a cliche?

    What is the alternative if I want to describe one's feeling when he/she is doing research in some field?
    It's probably a cliche.
    But what does s/he want to say? What is the actual feeling or thought? You don't have to use an already known saying to describe a unique feeling - or even a common feeling.

  3. #3
    enydia is offline Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Posts
    414
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: The more I know the less I understand

    Quote Originally Posted by Raymott View Post
    It's probably a cliche.
    But what does s/he want to say? What is the actual feeling or thought? You don't have to use an already known saying to describe a unique feeling - or even a common feeling.
    It's a formal essay with length limit.
    I just want to hide my inadequacy of writing.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Posts
    10
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: The more I know the less I understand

    This means "the more I research and attempt to find the answer to my question, the more questions I have." If a "cliche" means not to use it, I would say it is not a cliche (you can use the expression). I also use "ignorance is bliss" regularly, so maybe I am not the right person to answer that.

    In an essay, I would not be afraid to use it to show that you have fully researched and thought about your thesis. However, I would be sure to find a conclusion to the thesis and have well-reasoned analysis rather than using the expression to excuse questions that are raised that are not ultimately answered. If your analysis raises questions that are outside of your thesis (are not relevant), why highlight those? I think that just confuses things and detracts from your conclusion. That is a writing style suggestion and not an English language issue.

Similar Threads

  1. How to understand this?
    By studying in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 30-Jan-2009, 04:40
  2. How do you understand these?
    By belly_ttt in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 02-Aug-2007, 03:51
  3. Can someone help me understand this please?
    By patnall2003 in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 16-Jun-2006, 23:03
  4. I can't understand .
    By violets in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 30-May-2006, 09:04
  5. I can't understand--
    By YOSHITAKEHORI in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 21-Apr-2006, 14:16

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •