View Poll Results: She has ___ free time

Voters
1831. This poll is closed
  • much

    405 22.12%
  • a lot of

    1,291 70.51%
  • Either

    135 7.37%
Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 14

Thread: Much or A Lot

  1. #1
    Tdol is offline Editor, UsingEnglish.com
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • Philippines
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Posts
    43,263
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Much or A Lot

    Is there as rule of usage?

  2. #2
    RonBee's Avatar
    RonBee is offline Moderator
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Other
      • Native Language:
      • American English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Posts
    16,571
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    :) She has considerable free time.
    :) She has a great deal of free time.
    :) She has a lot of free time.
    :) She has loads of free time.
    :( She has much free time.

    If there is a rule I don't know it,
    But I am sure Cas will show it.

    :wink:

  3. #3
    CitySpeak Guest

    Default Re: Much or A Lot

    Quote Originally Posted by tdol
    Is there as rule of usage?
    We usually use "much" with negatives in our everyday and usual languge.

    "She doesn't have much free time."

    A - Do you have a lot of free time right now?

    B - No, not much.

    "She has much free time." - This doesn't sound very natural, though I suppose it would be grammatically correct. I might think it "okay" for emphasis in the right context.

    She has MUCH free time.


    We use "a lot" regularly with either a negative or an affirmative statement.

    "She has a lot of free time."

    "She doesn't have a lot of free time."

    We also use "much" with the adverbs "too" and "so" in an affirmative or negative statement. Of course, we have to take into consideration how the meaning is affected.

    "She has too much free time now."

    "She doesn't have too much free time these days."

    "She has so much free time now."

    "She doesn't have so much free time anymore."

    We usually use "much" with negatives in our everyday and usual languge. However, there would be and are times when "much" is used in an affirmative statement. The usage note explains this very well.

    http://dictionary.reference.com/search?q=much

    much

    adj : (quantifier used with mass nouns) great in quantity or degree or extent; "not much rain"; "much affection"; "much grain is in storage" [syn: much(a)] [ant: little(a)] n : a great amount or extent; "they did much for humanity" adv 1: to a great degree or extent; "she's much better now" 2: very; "he was much annoyed" 3: to a very great degree or extent; "we enjoyed ourselves very much"; "she was very much interested"; "this would help a great deal" [syn: a lot, a good deal, a great deal, very much] 4: (degree adverb used before a noun phrase) for all practical purposes but not completely; "much the same thing happened every time" [syn: practically] 5: frequently or in great quantities; "I don't drink much"; "I don't travel much" [syn: a great deal, often]

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Posts
    12,971
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: Much or A Lot

    She has too much free time. (OK)
    She has much too much free time. (OK)

    Iff much is modified it's okay.
    Iff much is left unmodified it's awkward.

    much works well in questions because its quantity is left undefined:

    How much free time do you have? (OK)

    The same holds true for negation:

    I haven't much free time / not much time. (OK)

    Using much as a quantifier doesn't work well:

    I have much free time (Not OK)

    unless it is itself quantified:

    I have too much free time.

    :D

  5. #5
    Tdol is offline Editor, UsingEnglish.com
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • Philippines
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Posts
    43,263
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    The unmodified form of 'much' does sound clumsy.

  6. #6
    RonBee's Avatar
    RonBee is offline Moderator
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Other
      • Native Language:
      • American English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Posts
    16,571
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: Much or A Lot

    Quote Originally Posted by Casiopea
    She has too much free time. (OK)
    She has much too much free time. (OK)

    Iff much is modified it's okay.
    Iff much is left unmodified it's awkward.

    much works well in questions because its quantity is left undefined:

    How much free time do you have? (OK)

    The same holds true for negation:

    I haven't much free time / not much time. (OK)

    Using much as a quantifier doesn't work well:

    I have much free time (Not OK)

    unless it is itself quantified:

    I have too much free time.

    :D
    Cas, how did you like my rhyme, and don't you think I have too much free time?

    :wink:

  7. #7
    CitySpeak Guest

    Default Re: Much or A Lot

    Quote Originally Posted by Casiopea
    She has too much free time. (OK)
    She has much too much free time. (OK)

    Iff much is modified it's okay.
    Iff much is left unmodified it's awkward.

    much works well in questions because its quantity is left undefined:

    How much free time do you have? (OK)

    The same holds true for negation:

    I haven't much free time / not much time. (OK)

    Using much as a quantifier doesn't work well:

    I have much free time (Not OK)

    unless it is itself quantified:

    I have too much free time.

    :D

    Yes, it simplifies things to simply say that "much" must be modified.

    :)

    I think it could be all right unmodified in the right context to show emphasis. It would be rather unusual sounding, but I think okay for emphasis in the proper context. Much of this would have to do with how the speaker wants to express himself or herself.

    Do you think so?


  8. #8
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Posts
    12,971
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: Much or A Lot

    Quote Originally Posted by RonBee
    Cas, how did you like my rhyme, and don't you think I have too much free time? :wink:
    I loved it. :D
    I myself cannot rhyme, at all. :(

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Posts
    12,971
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: Much or A Lot

    Quote Originally Posted by CitySpeak
    I think it could be all right unmodified in the right context to show emphasis. It would be rather unusual sounding, but I think okay for emphasis in the proper context. Much of this would have to do with how the speaker wants to express himself or herself.

    Do you think so?
    Uhm, well, hmm:

    Much of this would have... (Much is modified/defined by this)

    *Much would have... (Much is unmodified)

    :D

  10. #10
    Tdol is offline Editor, UsingEnglish.com
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • Philippines
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Posts
    43,263
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    You could say:

    Much was said....

    Couldn't you?

Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •