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    • Join Date: Mar 2010
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    #1

    People don't have bosses, they have sponsors -mentors- who watch out for their intere

    Hi, teacher!

    People don't have bosses, they have sponsors -mentors- who watch out for their interests.

    In the above, what does "have" mean exactly?

    In my thinking, two "have" seem to mean "need". Is that right ?

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    #2

    Re: People don't have bosses, they have sponsors -mentors- who watch out for their in

    It's difficult to put it in any simpler terms.

    There are no people called bosses - those people are called sponsors or mentors.

    Rover


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    #3

    Re: People don't have bosses, they have sponsors -mentors- who watch out for their in

    Thanks, Rover KE. But I don't know what you mean.

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    #4

    Re: People don't have bosses, they have sponsors -mentors- who watch out for their in

    Let's hope somebody else can express it more simply.

    Rover

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    #5

    Re: People don't have bosses, they have sponsors -mentors- who watch out for their in

    not a teacher.

    "Have" means "have" not "need."

    I have a boss. That means there is a person in a position of being my supervisor. Have indicates possession. He is my boss. I have a boss. It's not exactly the same as "I have a pencil" but the idea is the same.

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