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  1. #11
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    Re: since two months ago

    We have to be practical and really consider what we say and what can say when telling ESL students what they can say and cannot say. [/color]

    Well, of course. I wouldn't ask ESL students to comply with "my new rules". I haven't made any. It's just a plain observation on my part. Whether I like it or not, this new form of since and agois out there big time and has gained in popularity lately.
    I don't know where it originates from but, regardless of its awkwardness, I can see some logic behind it.

    That's an interesting point. It calls to mind a question: Does grammar account for everything that may or may not be said?

    Isn't that what grammar is for?

  2. #12
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    Steven D is offline Senior Member
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    Re: since two months ago

    Quote Originally Posted by Marylin
    We have to be practical and really consider what we say and what can say when telling ESL students what they can say and cannot say. [/color]

    Well, of course. I wouldn't ask ESL students to comply with "my new rules". I haven't made any. It's just a plain observation on my part. Whether I like it or not, this new form of since and agois out there big time and has gained in popularity lately.
    I don't know where it originates from but, regardless of its awkwardness, I can see some logic behind it.

    That's an interesting point. It calls to mind a question: Does grammar account for everything that may or may not be said?

    Isn't that what grammar is for?
    Yes, that's what it's for, but what about the question?

  3. #13
    Steven D's Avatar
    Steven D is offline Senior Member
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    Re: since two months ago

    Quote Originally Posted by Marylin
    We have to be practical and really consider what we say and what can say when telling ESL students what they can say and cannot say. [/color]

    Well, of course. I wouldn't ask ESL students to comply with "my new rules". I haven't made any. It's just a plain observation on my part. Whether I like it or not, this new form of since and ago is out there big time and has gained in popularity lately. I don't know where it originates from but, regardless of its awkwardness, I can see some logic behind it.

    Of course, I understand. But with the exception of my post, has anyone said "It is wrong. Don't say it. Don't write."? This is "ask a teacher" at an ESL/EFL forum. It seems that the original question was overlooked. The time adverbs were defined, but what about the question? Is it correct? The answer is: No, it is not correct.

    Is it correct to say "he has lived in this flat since two months ago"?

    No, that's not correct. There just might be those who want to say it's correct, but I would disagree with them.

    I'm not sure of just how popular "since......ago" is.

  4. #14
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    Re: since two months ago

    I have answered your question.

    It is correct. You can argue that it sounds funny all day long but like I have said and Marylin has said since a few hours ago it is technically correct. Again you can argue that this is just a technicality but we will turn around and say, "So...." To the question "Is it correct? Can I say this?" the answer is YES.

    To the question "Should I say this?" the answer is NO

    We have all agreed that it isn't natural or it isn't something we would say or should teach, but it is technically correct.

  5. #15
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    Re: since two months ago

    Of course, I understand. But with the exception of my post, has anyone said "It is wrong. Don't say it. Don't write."? This is "ask a teacher" at an ESL/EFL forum.

    Exactly. This indeed was "Ask a teacher" question at ESL forum, X. Nothing to do with you X. I was just thinking out loud.
    I agree with Mesmerk, I would stay away from using it but technically it does make some sense.

  6. #16
    cic Guest

    Re: since two months ago

    Many thanks for confirming what I maintained from the start but was finding difficulty in persuading my students.

    Not incorrect ... but not advisable ... but perfectly logical if we take it as the starting point.

    I'll have a more peaceful weekend. And a great one to you all too! And what a great discovery this forum is. Till the next time.
    Regards
    cic

  7. #17
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    Re: since two months ago

    University of Cambridge PET sentence transformation:

    He started living in this flat two months ago.
    He has lived in this flat ........ two months ago.

    The answer is SINCE.
    It is correct. Mind you, it's a transformation.

    He started living in this flat two months ago.
    Question: Since when did you start living in this flat?
    Answer: Since two months ago.

    => 'two months ago' functions as an adverbial phrase. 'since' tells us it's connected in time to 'started living'.

    We are looking at the architecture of the langauge, its mathematical code. Without the connection, though, the "context" 'started living', the sentence 'He started living in this flat *since two months ago', on it's own like that, is indeed semantically awkward. "for" is required in that enviornment, unless, that is, there is additional context to work from, which there was in this case, but was omitted.

    Context is important.

  8. #18
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    Re: since two months ago

    Welcome, mesmark.

    I used to live in Komagane, Nagano-ken. How's the weather up there these days?

  9. #19
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    Re: since two months ago

    As is, sans context, it's semantically awkward, agreed. Mind you, with context, which cic did provided, albeit in the second post, proves semantically meaningful. For example,

    Friend: He started living in this flat two month ago.
    Police Officer: Sorry. Since when?
    Friend: Since two months ago.

    There's a transformation strategy called Replacement. The 'Friend' replaced 'when' with 'two months ago'. That's the PET example.

  10. #20
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    Re: since two months ago

    It's sunny and beautiful. Highs in the low 80's with a nice cool breeze.

    Sakura have bloomed and gone, and the landscape is green. It's past grass cutting time but I'm going to wait and see if I can let it grow up past my shoulders. My son and I are going to have a wild hide and seek game in July.

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