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  1. #1
    trainee Guest

    language awareness task question

    Hi,

    I'm in the process of completing my language awareness task in order to apply for a CELTA course and have got stuck on one of the questions. It does say you can refer to grammar book but I can't find one to buy (I'm in Indonesia) I hope this is not cheating but can someone help me with the following exchange

    "Is John ill? He's lost a lot of weight."
    "Yes, he's rather slender these days, isn't he?"

    I have to identify, correct and explain the mistake. I had no problem with the rest of the task but am having a mental block with this.

    Thanks

  2. #2
    A.Russell is offline Member
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    Re: language awareness task question

    Is there really a mistake in that?

  3. #3
    trainee Guest

    Re: language awareness task question

    I did wonder that, The others are quite straightforward stuff like tense changes, past continuous instead of simple past, difference in meaning of words etc.

    If you guys don't know maybe it's a trick question!

    Thanks

  4. #4
    Tdol is offline Editor, UsingEnglish.com
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    Re: language awareness task question

    'slender' has a positive connotation, and doesn't go with illness. Try thin/underweight

  5. #5
    hashoomer is offline Newbie
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    Re: language awareness task question

    Hi
    I don't think that it is a trick question. I think that "He's lost a lot of weight."

    He's is the shortened version of HE IS. Here the situation is that he has already lost the weight and so should read; "He has lost a lot of weight"

    I would be grateful if you could email your other ones to compare as i am also doing this.

    Thanks

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  6. #6
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    RonBee is offline Moderator
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    Re: language awareness task question

    Quote Originally Posted by hashoomer View Post
    Hi
    I don't think that it is a trick question. I think that "He's lost a lot of weight."

    He's is the shortened version of HE IS. Here the situation is that he has already lost the weight and so should read; "He has lost a lot of weight"

    I would be grateful if you could email your other ones to compare as i am also doing this.

    Thanks
    No, I don't think that's it. In the context "He's" would be understood to mean "He has".

    As for the example conversation, I would need more context to decide that somebody has somehow made an error.

    ~R

  7. #7
    Tdol is offline Editor, UsingEnglish.com
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    Re: language awareness task question

    Quote Originally Posted by hashoomer View Post

    He's is the shortened version of HE IS.
    It can be 'he is' or 'he has'.

  8. #8
    soltiss1 is offline Newbie
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    Re: language awareness task question

    It's possible that the mistake is lexical. I don't think you would say that someone looks slender if they lost weight due to being sick. I think a better word would be thin. One would look slender if they had been going to the gym or dieting.
    In any case, good luck!

  9. #9
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    Re: language awareness task question

    Positive connotations: slim, slender
    Neutral or negative connotations: thin, underweight, anorexic




    (This thread was started in 2005)





  10. #10
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    Re: language awareness task question

    Quote Originally Posted by trainee View Post
    Hi,

    I'm in the process of completing my language awareness task in order to apply for a CELTA course and have got stuck on one of the questions. It does say you can refer to grammar book but I can't find one to buy (I'm in Indonesia) I hope this is not cheating but can someone help me with the following exchange

    "Is John ill? He's lost a lot of weight."
    "Yes, he's rather slender these days, isn't he?"

    I have to identify, correct and explain the mistake. I had no problem with the rest of the task but am having a mental block with this.

    Thanks
    OK, so this thread is now close to 4 years old and "trainee" has probably long since moved on to other concerns. Nonetheless, in the interest of putting this one to its final rest, may I suggest the following grammatical correction?

    "Is John ill? He's lost a lot of weight."
    "Yes, he's rather slender these days. Isn't he?"

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