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  1. #1
    TimEndeavours is offline Newbie
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    Usage of wish and hope

    Dear all, I have wrote a few sentences to test out whether I am understand the correct usage of wish and hope or not. Please kindly help me to check my sentences:

    1. I wish tomorrow were going to be a rainy day as I do not wish to go to the camp. (100% sure that tomorrow is going to be Sunny)


    2. I hope tomorrow is going to be a rainy day. (the weather report is not so accurate, therefore there is a possibility that tomorrow would really be rainy. As I cannot be sure that tomorrow is not a rainy day, I must not use "wish" since "wish" is applied when one is certain about one thing and the person wants the certain thing to be different)
    in

    3. I wish I had worked harder in the past.



    4. I wish the boy would stop screaming out loud when he is playing the computer games.


    5. I hope you can join our trip. ( I was told that we should use "hope + can/will/are able to/is able to" to talk about the things you just want to happen but not to be different in the future.)


    6. I hope you could join our trip. ( Is this correct, however? If so, would it be even more polite then the previous one? Would it also be more uncertain than the number 5 sentence?)



    When it comes to "wish + would" and "wish + past tense + bare infinitive", I am not quite certain when to use which, particularly for the first combination. Could you please also explain it to me?


    Thank you so much for your helping hands!

  2. #2
    Join Date
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    Re: Usage of wish and hope

    Quote Originally Posted by TimEndeavours View Post
    Dear all, I have wrote a few sentences to test out whether I am understand the correct usage of wish and hope or not. Please kindly help me to check my sentences:
    You mean you have "written" a few sentences.

    1. I wish tomorrow were going to be a rainy day as I do not wish to go to the camp. (100% sure that tomorrow is going to be Sunny)
    Incorrect. Until tomorrow becomes today, you are hoping. You can never be 100% certain about the weather, or, really, anything in the future. The correct way to say this is, "I hope tomorrow is going to be a rainy day, as I do not wish to go to the camp." A more natural way would be "I hope it rains tomorrow so I don't have to go to the camp." If you want to add that you know it will be sunny, you could write, "I hope it rains tomorrow, though I know it won't, because..."

    3. I wish I had worked harder in the past.
    4. I wish the boy would stop screaming out loud when he is playing the computer games
    5. I hope you can join our trip.
    Correct, except omit the word "the" before computer games.

    ( I was told that we should use "hope + can/will/are able to/is able to" to talk about the things you just want to happen but not to be different in the future.)
    I don't understand--what does it mean to want something to happen but not to be different in the future?

    6. I hope you could join our trip. ( Is this correct, however? If so, would it be even more polite then the previous one? Would it also be more uncertain than the number 5 sentence?)
    Incorrect, though I'm trying to figure out why. I'll let you know when I figure it out.

    Edited to add: OK, here's the problem. You only "hope" for things in the future. "Could" is past tense. Now, you are correct that "could" is used to make a request more polite, i.e. "could you help me?" instead of "can you help me?" even though you are requesting an action that has not happened yet. But the rules for the imperative (command) and interrogative (question) forms are different than they are for the indicative (statement.) "I hope you can join our trip" is a statement, not a request, even though making that statement might imply a request.

    You could say, "I was hoping you could join our trip." This could be used in the case of your having made the offer and the person's having declined. However, it could also be used to imply an invitation! So there's still something to this I haven't figured out yet. It must be related to "was hoping" and "could" both being past tense, but I can't quite articulate the rule. Maybe someone else out there can.

    When it comes to "wish + would" and "wish + past tense + bare infinitive", I am not quite certain when to use which, particularly for the first combination. Could you please also explain it to me?
    "Hope" is for things that might actually happen in the future. "Wish" is for things that didn't happen the way you wanted (I wish I had worked harder!), or aren't true in the present (I wish you were here!) or are extremely unlikely to happen in the future (I wish this war would end!)
    Last edited by Heterological; 30-Jun-2010 at 21:27.

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