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Thread: Money vs bucks

  1. #1
    whl626 is offline Member
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    Default Money vs bucks

    These days, i just like to use bucks instead of money in the speech.

    I wonder if ' much ' or ' many ' should go with bucks ?

    eg I don't think I could earn ( much )(many ) bucks from this assignment ???

  2. #2
    lucyarliwu Guest

    Default Re: Money vs bucks

    Quote Originally Posted by whl626
    These days, i just like to use bucks instead of money in the speech.

    I wonder if ' much ' or ' many ' should go with bucks ?

    eg I don't think I could earn ( much )(many ) bucks from this assignment ???
    Hi, I 'm afaid you have to choose 'many' here to modify bucks.

    Lucy wu in China

  3. #3
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    Default bucks

    By the way, I believe the word bucks comes from a time when people traded buck skins or male deer in place of money. One buck, two bucks, "How many bucks you got?"

    Smile :D
    In the North of Canada, specifically in a small city in the Yukon Territory, there was an elderly gentleman who had kept everything he had ever bought and when he turned 80 or so he decided he'd have a yard sale to get rid of all his possessions. During the yard sale, the elderly gentleman used the word "buck" instead of "bucks". He'd say "That there is 4 buck! and that over there is 3 buck" and so on. A few months later, the elderly man passed away, and as tribute to his memory the folks of the city started using the word "buck". (True story)

    Point: In some dialects of English the word "bucks" has an irregular form, 'buck': one buck, two buck, "How many buck you got?" :D

  4. #4
    Tdol is offline Editor, UsingEnglish.com
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    Default

    'Quid' in English, which is slang for 'pound' also doesn't take 's' in the plural. Many BE speakers say '5 pound' quite happily.

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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by tdol
    'Quid' in English, which is slang for 'pound' also doesn't take 's' in the plural. Many BE speakers say '5 pound' quite happily.
    My German teacher corrected me when I pluralized pfund. I'm guessing that's why some British speakers don't pluralize pound.

    Iain

  6. #6
    Tdol is offline Editor, UsingEnglish.com
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    Default

    I imagine so. It is also used so frequently as an adjective- a five-pound note, etc, that it sounds correct.

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