Results 1 to 6 of 6
  1. #1
    Nathan Mckane is offline Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Student or Learner
      • Native Language:
      • Persian
      • Home Country:
      • Iran
      • Current Location:
      • Iran
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Posts
    385
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default To swim and swimming

    Hi !

    What's the difference between these two regarding meaning ?

    I like to swim .
    I like swimming .

    I read in a book that when you say ''I like to swim'' you actualy mean that you want to swim on that specefic occasion and by saying ''I like swimming'' you are stating that you like it in general .

    Thanks/

  2. #2
    TheParser is online now VIP Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Other
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Posts
    5,148
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: To swim and swimming

    Quote Originally Posted by Nathan Mckane View Post
    Hi !

    What's the difference between these two regarding meaning ?

    I like to swim .
    I like swimming .

    I read in a book that when you say ''I like to swim'' you actualy mean that you want to swim on that specefic occasion and by saying ''I like swimming'' you are stating that you like it in general .

    Thanks/
    ********** NOT A TEACHER **********

    Hello, Mr. McKane.

    (1) Yes, that is also something similar to what I hear.

    (2) A grammar book that is used by many American teachers

    (The Grammar Book by Mesdames Celce-Murcia and Larsen-Freeman)

    gives these examples:

    I like camping in the mountains. (It is so peaceful HERE) =

    more immediate and more vivid

    ***

    I like to camp in the mountains. (It is so peaceful THERE) =

    more remote, more objective

    *****

    Personally, I feel that if you meet an old friend on the street, it would be

    more emotional to say, "Wow! It is so nice seeing you after all these

    years!!!" I feel that "It's nice to see you" would lack warmth.

    ***** Thank you.

  3. #3
    2006 is offline Banned
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Other
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • Canada
      • Current Location:
      • Canada
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Posts
    4,161
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: To swim and swimming

    Quote Originally Posted by Nathan Mckane View Post
    Hi !

    What's the difference between these two regarding meaning?
    Don't leave a space between the last word and the period or question mark.
    I like to swim.
    I like swimming.

    The two sentences mean the same thing. The second one is more common.


    I read in a book that when you say ''I like to swim'' you actualy mean that you want to swim on that specific occasion No, it doesn't mean that. But "I'd like to swim." can mean that.


    and by saying ''I like swimming'' you are stating that you like it in general . Both of your sentences mean this.

    Thanks/
    2006

  4. #4
    bertietheblue is offline Senior Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Other
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • UK
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Posts
    577
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: To swim and swimming

    The general difference after verbs that can take either an infinitive and gerund is that the infinitive is often specific and the gerund often general. Compare:

    I like swimming.
    I like to swim in the sea when the weather is really hot.

    That said, they are pretty much interchangeable.

    "At least in this instance," he adds.

  5. #5
    2006 is offline Banned
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Other
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • Canada
      • Current Location:
      • Canada
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Posts
    4,161
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: To swim and swimming

    Quote Originally Posted by bertietheblue View Post
    The general difference after verbs that can take either an infinitive and gerund is that the infinitive is often specific and the gerund often general. Compare:

    I like swimming.
    I like to swim in the sea when the weather is really hot.

    That said, they are pretty much interchangeable.
    And one could also say 'I like swimming in the sea when the weather is really hot.'

    2006

  6. #6
    Tdol is offline Editor, UsingEnglish.com
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • Japan
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Posts
    43,618
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: To swim and swimming

    You could, but from previous discussions, I get the impression that the infinitive for a restricted or conditional fondness is more marked in BrE.

Similar Threads

  1. swim/swimming
    By jayan12 in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 03-Apr-2010, 12:08
  2. i go to swim or i go swimming
    By cazrob30 in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 12-Nov-2008, 22:27
  3. No swimming / No swim
    By puzzle in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 31-Aug-2007, 03:25
  4. what about doing to swim or going swimming
    By Unregistered in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 28-May-2007, 11:55
  5. an open air swimming pool or an outdoor swimming pool
    By zoobinshid in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 25-Jul-2005, 12:11

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •