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  1. #1
    LiuJing is offline Member
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    Default How to pronounce bringing correctly?

    My roommate and I are discussing the pronunciation of 'bringing'.

    I prefer to pronounce it as bring-ning, and his way is bring-ing.

    My logic is based on ringing being said as ring-ning, and his is singing is sing-ing, not sing-ning.

    Both of us are confused. Thank you in advance.

  2. #2
    xpert's Avatar
    xpert is offline Senior Member
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    Default Re: How to pronounce bringing correctly?

    The correct pronunciation is /ˈbrɪŋ ɪŋ/. Notice that [ng] is nasalized.

    Source: Longman Pronunciation Dictionary

  3. #3
    carol.j is offline Newbie
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    Smile Re: How to pronounce bringing correctly?

    Quote Originally Posted by LiuJing View Post
    My roommate and I are discussing the pronunciation of 'bringing'.

    I prefer to pronounce it as bring-ning, and his way is bring-ing.

    My logic is based on ringing being said as ring-ning, and his is singing is sing-ing, not sing-ning.

    Both of us are confused. Thank you in advance.
    Hi LiuJing,

    The correct pronunciation for both ringing and singing is 'ring-ing' and 'sing-ing' respectively. There is no 'n' sound after ring or sing.

    Hope this helps.

  4. #4
    Raymott's Avatar
    Raymott is offline VIP Member
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    Default Re: How to pronounce bringing correctly?

    Quote Originally Posted by carol.j View Post
    Hi LiuJing,

    The correct pronunciation for both ringing and singing is 'ring-ing' and 'sing-ing' respectively. There is no 'n' sound after ring or sing.

    Hope this helps.
    I agree. In fact, there is no /n/ sound at all in these words, as illustrated in the above phonetic transcription.
    /n/ is pronounced with the tongue on the alveolar ridge. The tongue goes nowhere near here when saying 'bringing'.

  5. #5
    2006 is offline Key Member
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    Default Re: How to pronounce bringing correctly?

    Quote Originally Posted by Raymott View Post
    I agree. In fact, there is no /n/ sound at all in these words, as illustrated in the above phonetic transcription.
    /n/ is pronounced with the tongue on the alveolar ridge. The tongue goes nowhere near here when saying 'bringing'.
    There are n sounds in "ringing" and "singing", at least in North American English. Otherwise the pronunciations would be 'rigig' and 'sigig'.
    Last edited by 2006; 15-Jul-2010 at 22:32. Reason: correct spelling

  6. #6
    Barb_D's Avatar
    Barb_D is offline Moderator
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    Default Re: How to pronounce bringing correctly?

    The n in the ng combo is not the same as plain n, though.

    It's neither brigging nor brinning.

    And it's certainly not bring-ning.
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

  7. #7
    Raymott's Avatar
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    Default Re: How to pronounce bringing correctly?

    Quote Originally Posted by 2006 View Post
    There are n sounds in "ringing" and "singing", at least in North American English. Otherwise the pronunciations would be 'rigig' and 'sigig'.
    / ŋ/ is a velar nasal. It's a separate phonetic sound from /n/, and does not contain an alveolar nasal (/n/). 'ringing' has two / ŋ/, two 'I' and an /r/, as in the transciption that xpert has posted. If you look closely, you'll see there is no /n/. In fact, if you say /n/ several times, and then say "ringing', you'll see that /n/ doesn't enter into it. Nor, as Barb rightly says, does /g/.
    I'm trying to say an /n/ sound with 'ringing', but it's impossible.
    If you can do it, can you post a sound file?

  8. #8
    2006 is offline Key Member
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    Default Re: How to pronounce bringing correctly?

    Quote Originally Posted by Raymott View Post
    / ŋ/ is a velar nasal. It's a separate phonetic sound from /n/, and does not contain an alveolar nasal (/n/). 'ringing' has two / ŋ/, two 'I' and an /r/, as in the transciption that xpert has posted. If you look closely, you'll see there is no /n/. In fact, if you say /n/ several times, and then say "ringing', you'll see that /n/ doesn't enter into it.
    No one is saying that the n sound in those words is the same as what one hears when the alphabet n is recited.
    Nor, as Barb rightly says, does /g/. I don't know that Barb said that.
    Again, the 'ng' sound is very different from that of isolated n and g sounds said in sequence. But there are variants of n and g sounds in those words.
    2006

  9. #9
    Raymott's Avatar
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    Default Re: How to pronounce bringing correctly?

    Quote Originally Posted by 2006 View Post
    2006

    Well, if you want to call /θ/ and /đ/ variants of /t/, and /ʃ/ a variant of /s/, I can see your point. But I disagree.
    These are not allophones: they are not variants of the same sound. If you replaced /ŋ/ with /n/ or /ng/ you would often get a different word. They are different phonemes.

    'Finger' and 'linger' have /g/ sounds in them, but 'singer' and springer don't.

    So there is also no /t/ sound in ‘both’ or ‘other’ and there’s no /s/ sound in “shot” (as they are normally pronounced).

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