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  1. #1
    vil is offline VIP Member
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    Default has gone to his head

    Dear teachers,

    Would you be kind enough to tell me whether I am right with my interpretation of the expression in bold in the following sentence?

    Success has gone to his head.

    go to one’s head = make one proud or vain

    Thanks for your efforts.

    Regards,

    V.
    Last edited by vil; 14-Jul-2010 at 18:20.

  2. #2
    bertietheblue is offline Senior Member
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    Default Re: has gone to his head


  3. #3
    TheParser is offline VIP Member
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    Default Re: has gone to his head

    Quote Originally Posted by vil View Post
    Dear teachers,

    Would you be kind enough to tell me whether I am right with my interpretation of the expression in bold in the following sentence?

    Success has gone to his head.

    go to one’s head = make one proud or vain

    Thanks for your efforts.

    Regards,

    V.



    ********** NOT A TEACHER **********

    Hello, Vil.

    (1) I know how hard you are working to enlarge your English

    vocabulary.

    (2) You probably already know it, but in case you do not, may I

    introduce you to a "big" noun that is being used by many serious

    American writers: hubris.

    The dictionary says it means excessive pride, overconfidence, or

    arrogance.

    (a) I think it is usually applied to the actions of national leaders or

    leaders of big companies.

    (b) I cannot give you any current examples, because I do not

    want to make anyone angry.

    (c) I think that I can give you an example of hubris during

    World War II:

    The leader of country X was very arrogant and full of self-confidence.

    So he ordered the invasion of country Y. It turned out to be a

    disaster and probably the beginning of the end for that leader.

    Thank you

  4. #4
    kfredson is offline Senior Member
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    Default Re: has gone to his head

    Quote Originally Posted by vil View Post
    Dear teachers,

    Would you be kind enough to tell me whether I am right with my interpretation of the expression in bold in the following sentence?

    Success has gone to his head.

    go to one’s head = make one proud or vain

    Thanks for your efforts.

    Regards,

    V.
    Yes, your definition is fine. As The Parser points out below, it can also mean that it will make you so sure of yourself that you will be excessively confident -- and, thus, possibly make a big mistake.

    Success has gone to his head. "Having won so many poker hands in a row he decided to go 'all in' and bet the deed to his house."

    Now, if you simply want to show that someone has become vain you might say, "Success has given him a swelled head."

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