Page 3 of 3 FirstFirst 1 2 3
Results 21 to 27 of 27
  1. #21
    IHIVG's Avatar
    IHIVG is offline Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Interested in Language
      • Native Language:
      • Russian
      • Home Country:
      • Russian Federation
      • Current Location:
      • Russian Federation
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Posts
    354
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: meter in "Sir Thaddeus"

    Ah, 'art' is archaic 'are' here!!! Thank you. Of course I thought of it as a NOUN! Now THAT makes sense.
    ... my country, you
    Are like good health...

    Back to the Baltics. The way people pronounce Lithuania always sounded 4-syllabic to me -- [li-thuei-ni-a]. That's why I couldn't understand the stress on 'li'. The dictionary gives [li-thju-ei-ni-a]. (although this 'thju' is almost imperceptible in speech isn't it?)
    Now I can see why 'li' has a slight stress given that Lithuania has 5 syllables:

    O Lithuania my country thou. and this makes iambic tetrameter for me.
    Now the only thing that I don't understand is the stress on the last 'a'.
    Do you accentuate it when you read the line? It just sounds awkward to me if I do.

  2. #22
    BobK's Avatar
    BobK is offline Harmless drudge
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • UK
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Posts
    15,764
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: meter in "Sir Thaddeus"

    Quote Originally Posted by IHIVG View Post
    Ah, 'art' is archaic 'are' here!!! Thank you. Of course I thought of it as a NOUN! Now THAT makes sense.
    ... my country, you
    Are like good health...

    Back to the Baltics. The way people pronounce Lithuania always sounded 4-syllabic to me -- [li-thuei-ni-a]. That's why I couldn't understand the stress on 'li'. The dictionary gives [li-thju-ei-ni-a]. (although this 'thju' is almost imperceptible in speech isn't it?)
    Now I can see why 'li' has a slight stress given that Lithuania has 5 syllables:

    O Lithuania my country thou. and this makes iambic tetrameter for me.
    Now the only thing that I don't understand is the stress on the last 'a'.
    Do you accentuate it when you read the line? It just sounds awkward to me if I do.
    We speakers of English aren't very good at pronouncing other languages' diphthongs! Mrs Thatcher used it almost as a weapon of war 'Gal-ti-e-ri'; the message was 'You foreigners may think it has only three syllables, but I shall do what's right!'

    I don't stress the 'a' at the end. I think you're confusing word stress with poetical stress. Perhaps they are more closely linked in your language's literature. The 'a' is not stressed; is just has more weight than 'my'.

    b

  3. #23
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Posts
    7
    Post Thanks / Like

    Post Re: meter in "Sir Thaddeus"

    i feel stupid for asking but is this written by shakespear? i didnt study this kind of stuff much.

  4. #24
    birdeen's call is offline VIP Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Student or Learner
      • Native Language:
      • Polish
      • Home Country:
      • Poland
      • Current Location:
      • Poland
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Posts
    5,098
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: meter in "Sir Thaddeus"

    Hi, Alan. Could you please type more carefully? Capital letters and apostrophes won't harm you.

    No, it wasn't written by Shakespeare. It was written by Adam Mickiewicz.

  5. #25
    Frank Antonson's Avatar
    Frank Antonson is offline Senior Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Posts
    1,151
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: meter in "Sir Thaddeus"

    I have been too lazy to read all of the posts, but I immediately thought that so much may have depended upon the performance of the speaker, that is, to recite to a beat.

  6. #26
    5jj's Avatar
    5jj is offline VIP Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Retired English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • Czech Republic
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Posts
    28,167
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: meter in "Sir Thaddeus"

    Quote Originally Posted by Frank Antonson View Post
    I have been too lazy to read all of the posts, but I immediately thought that so much may have depended upon the performance of the speaker, that is, to recite to a beat.
    One reason I abstain from participation in such discussions on metre, apart from my ignorance, is that I feel that sometimes what the poet intends and what the reader feels may be two different things.

    I gave up any serious attempt to decide what type of metre was used when I read once:

    If we read the first two syllables of an amphibrachic line as an iambus, the remainder of the line may be considered as anapæstic, e.g. –

    There cáme│to the beách │a poor éx│ile of É│rin,
    The déw│on his thín│robe was heá│vy and chíll.

    Similarly, if we read the first two syllables of a dactylic line as a trochee, the remainder of the line may be considered as amphibrachic, e.g. –

    Bríghtest│and bést of│the sóns of│the mórning.

    Daniel, the Rev. Canon (1904) The Grammar, History and Derivation of the English Language, London: National Society’s Depository


    It seems that you pays your money and you takes your choice.

  7. #27
    303111064 is offline Newbie
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Student or Learner
      • Native Language:
      • Chinese
      • Home Country:
      • China
      • Current Location:
      • China
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Posts
    4
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: meter in "Sir Thaddeus"

    I feel it's difficult.

Page 3 of 3 FirstFirst 1 2 3

Similar Threads

  1. "dear sir" for low rank person
    By hesham alhelali in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 27-Oct-2009, 10:53
  2. Replies: 2
    Last Post: 08-Sep-2008, 09:27
  3. Replies: 1
    Last Post: 20-Jun-2008, 00:38
  4. confusing words "expressed" or "express" and "named" or"names"
    By Dawood Usmani in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 26-Oct-2007, 20:33
  5. Addressing someone as "sir" or "mister"
    By lingua in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 10-Sep-2007, 11:13

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •