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Thread: some terms

  1. #1
    zoobinshid's Avatar
    zoobinshid is offline Member
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    Exclamation some terms

    Hello my dear masters,
    May i ask you to help me with these terms...
    I want to know if they are common and what do they Mean...Any other term which has a meaning close to them?

    1) It won`t make the sky fall.
    2) To get through with someone\something.
    3) He ended up with his lights out.
    4) I made you but you made me first.
    5) I`m of a mind to make some mooky.
    6) I smell fresh ink.
    7) drip dry.

    All the best.

  2. #2
    medontneednonaimtoyuze Guest

    Re: some terms

    1) It won't make the sky fall.
    I've lived in America all my life and have never heard it, but if it's supposed to mean something like it's not as bad as possible, or something, I would understand it. A more common phrase is "It's not the end of the world."

    2) To get through with someone/something
    It's fairly common. It means to finish with someone/something.

    3) He ended up with his lights out.
    If you're trying to say what I think you are, it would mean to get knocked-out (unconsious). That way isn't very good. The better way to say it is "He got his lights knocked out."

    4) I made you but you made me first.
    That doesn't make much sense at all. If it's supposed to mean something like, "I made you do this, but you made me do this first," The closest expression I can think of that would mean what I think you're trying to say is "What goes around comes around." People get what they deserve. A good example is if someone steals from someone and comes home to a burglarized house. Also, the phrase "You had it coming" would be if, say, a person was a real jerk and someobody beat him up for it.

    5) I'm of a mind to make some mooky.
    I have no idea what mooky is, but if you saw it in an English dictionary, I'd like to know so I can impress and confuse my friends. "I've got half a mind to do something" would mean that you want to do something (usually of a negative nature towards someone else), but probably aren't. That's common in the Southern U.S. (Southern as in the Southeast.)

    6) I smell fresh ink.
    7) Drip dry.
    Never heard of or comprehend either of them at all.

  3. #3
    M56 Guest

    Re: some terms

    Quote Originally Posted by medontneednonaimtoyuze
    1) It won't make the sky fall.
    I've lived in America all my life and have never heard it, but if it's supposed to mean something like it's not as bad as possible, or something, I would understand it. A more common phrase is "It's not the end of the world."

    2) To get through with someone/something
    It's fairly common. It means to finish with someone/something.

    3) He ended up with his lights out.
    If you're trying to say what I think you are, it would mean to get knocked-out (unconsious). That way isn't very good. The better way to say it is "He got his lights knocked out."

    4) I made you but you made me first.
    That doesn't make much sense at all. If it's supposed to mean something like, "I made you do this, but you made me do this first," The closest expression I can think of that would mean what I think you're trying to say is "What goes around comes around." People get what they deserve. A good example is if someone steals from someone and comes home to a burglarized house. Also, the phrase "You had it coming" would be if, say, a person was a real jerk and someobody beat him up for it.

    5) I'm of a mind to make some mooky.
    I have no idea what mooky is, but if you saw it in an English dictionary, I'd like to know so I can impress and confuse my friends. "I've got half a mind to do something" would mean that you want to do something (usually of a negative nature towards someone else), but probably aren't. That's common in the Southern U.S. (Southern as in the Southeast.)

    6) I smell fresh ink.
    7) Drip dry.
    Never heard of or comprehend either of them at all.
    Here you go. Now you can impress your friends.

    Moo·ky
    adj. moo·ky·er, moo·ki·est
    old. moo.kie
    Irish. Muh.kičic

    1. kooky
    2. cool
    3. intelligent
    4. funny
    5. alternative
    6. leftfield
    7. stylish
    8. irreverent
    9. inspired
    10. adventurous

    Can be used (very broadly) in street slang for any particularly wonderful inanimate objects eg, 'That's a mooky pair of strides you're sporting, missy' or 'My, those strawberries look mooky enough for my strawberry daquiris' etc.

    http://www.mookychick.co.uk/mookychi...definition.php

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