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  1. #11
    Frank Antonson's Avatar
    Frank Antonson is offline Senior Member
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    Default Re: I, for one, like X

    "Sentence adverb" is a new term for me. Does it mean that an adverb modifies the whole clause instead of the simple predicate? To me, adverbs modify verbs, adjectives, or other adverbs. Furthermore, they answer one of the four questions -- how, when, where, or why. "Adverb" is a part of speech. "Modifier" is a part of a sentence. I think it is pretty important that the two regimes (morphology and syntax) do not get confused. "For one" pretty clearly is a modifier. I guess the question, then, comes down to "Which sentence part does it modify?"

    On another matter, I must admit, Parser, that I am interested in who are the authorities that you consult.

    Still on another matter, I think it would be worth your while, dear Parser, to find a way to diagram online. "SmartDraw 7: Suite edition" is what I use.

  2. #12
    TheParser is offline VIP Member
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    Default Re: I, for one, like X

    Quote Originally Posted by Frank Antonson View Post
    "Sentence adverb" is a new term for me. Does it mean that an adverb modifies the whole clause instead of the simple predicate? To me, adverbs modify verbs, adjectives, or other adverbs. Furthermore, they answer one of the four questions -- how, when, where, or why. "Adverb" is a part of speech. "Modifier" is a part of a sentence. I think it is pretty important that the two regimes (morphology and syntax) do not get confused. "For one" pretty clearly is a modifier. I guess the question, then, comes down to "Which sentence part does it modify?"

    On another matter, I must admit, Parser, that I am interested in who are the authorities that you consult.

    Still on another matter, I think it would be worth your while, dear Parser, to find a way to diagram online. "SmartDraw 7: Suite edition" is what I use.
    Thanks for your kind note.

    I believe that sentence adverb (or disjunct in current terminology) is quite well-known and accepted.

    For example, The Oxford Dictionary of English Grammarsays they qualify the sentence as a whole rather than any particular part. For example:

    Truly, certainly, assuredly, undoubtedly, etc.

    My favorite is kindly. When you say "Would you kindly move?" the adverb does not mean "in a kind manner." It means Would you be kind enough to ....[BUT: He spoke kindly. = He spoke in a kind manner.]

    Do you have Professors Pence and Emery's A Grammar of Present-Day English. They say that the adverbs in these sentences seem to modify the sentences, BUT they admit it is easier to just say they modify the verb:

    I scarcely know what to say.
    She never fails to smile.
    John has not arrived. [In another book, I read that notreally modifies the whole sentence because a sentence like that means: It is not the case that John has arrived.]
    Evidently he missed the train. [That is, it is evident that he .... It is not possible to miss the train in an evident manner.]

    By the way, I am delighted to note that more and more people are discovering the Analysing [Analyzing] and Diagramming forum. I have received so much help from you -- as have others.

    Thank you

  3. #13
    Frank Antonson's Avatar
    Frank Antonson is offline Senior Member
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    Default Re: I, for one, like X

    Okay, I know what you are talking about. You explained it well. I have just never heard the term. I guess I would have called it an "absolute phrase" or and "interjection" or something like that. In any case, it would be diagrammed the same way by the Reed-Kellogg system, i.e. not connected by any line to the clause.

  4. #14
    BobK's Avatar
    BobK is offline Harmless drudge
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    Default Re: I, for one, like X

    Quote Originally Posted by TheParser View Post
    ...
    For example, The Oxford Dictionary of English Grammarsays they qualify the sentence as a whole rather than any particular part. For example:

    Truly, certainly, assuredly, undoubtedly, etc.

    My favorite is kindly. When you say "Would you kindly move?" the adverb does not mean "in a kind manner." It means Would you be kind enough to ....[BUT: He spoke kindly. = He spoke in a kind manner.]

    ...
    And, notably, for some users, "Hopefully". Personally, I can't bring myself to use it in any other sense than 'in a hopeful state of mind*', but I know when I'm beat!

    *Not entirely coincidentally, this is where all those -ment(e) endings come from in Fr, Sp, It, Pg, Cat. etc.

    b

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