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  1. #1
    raylearnenglish is offline Newbie
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    I can't stand it

    What is meaning for I can't stand it?

    How I should use that ?

    Can I say the following:

    1. I can't stand John?

    2. My wife can't stand the way Linda behaves?

    Please let me know?

  2. #2
    philadelphia's Avatar
    philadelphia is offline Senior Member
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    Re: I can't stand it

    Quote Originally Posted by raylearnenglish View Post
    What is meaning for I can't stand it?

    How I should use that ?

    Can I say the following:

    1. I can't stand John?

    2. My wife can't stand the way Linda behaves?

    Please let me know?
    I can't stand = I can't accept

  3. #3
    emsr2d2's Avatar
    emsr2d2 is offline Moderator
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    Re: I can't stand it

    Quote Originally Posted by philadelphia View Post
    I can't stand = I can't accept
    I disagree.

    I can't stand = I really don't like/I hate

  4. #4
    philadelphia's Avatar
    philadelphia is offline Senior Member
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    Re: I can't stand it

    Quote Originally Posted by emsr2d2 View Post
    I disagree.

    I can't stand = I really don't like/I hate
    Stand (accept)
    Definition of stand verb (ACCEPT) from Cambridge Dictionary Online: Free English Dictionary and Thesaurus

  5. #5
    Barb_D's Avatar
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    Re: I can't stand it

    In the US, we use it as ems has described.

    I can't stand her = I detest/hate/abhor/greatly dislike her.
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

  6. #6
    philadelphia's Avatar
    philadelphia is offline Senior Member
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    Re: I can't stand it

    Quote Originally Posted by Barb_D View Post
    In the US, we use it as ems has described.

    I can't stand her = I detest/hate/abhor/greatly dislike her.
    I do not disagree on that. Though eg 'I can't stand going to jail' - can't stand means can't accept and do not like, right?

    However, I would have to make it clear that stand (accept) was for the second sentence.

  7. #7
    BobK's Avatar
    BobK is offline Harmless drudge
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    Re: I can't stand it

    I think what emsdr2 disagreed with was your use of 'accept John' as meaning 'accept John's behaviour'.

    If someone said to me 'I don't accept you' I would wonder what they meant (but I might entertain the possibility that they were using 'accept' in a recently trendy [and very informal] meaning 'accept the behaviour of' - a short form typical of Californian pop-psychologists. A person can't be (in the words of that dictionary) 'difficult', except in a metaphorical way 'John can be very difficult at times'; the metaphor isn't obvious at first glance, but John isn't difficult - he just does things that are difficult to handle (and this secondary meaning has no doubt found its way into many dictionaries).

    b
    Last edited by BobK; 27-Jul-2010 at 17:38. Reason: Added last sentence

  8. #8
    philadelphia's Avatar
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    Re: I can't stand it

    Quote Originally Posted by BobK View Post
    I think what emsdr2 disagreed with was your use of 'accept John' as meaning 'accept John's behaviour'.

    If someone said to me 'I don't accept you' I would wonder what they meant (but I might entertain the possibility that they were using 'accept' in a recently trendy [and very informal] meaning 'accept the behaviour of' - a short form typical of Californian pop-psychologists.

    b
    And Bobk comes on! You are definitely right

  9. #9
    emsr2d2's Avatar
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    Re: I can't stand it

    To me:

    I can't stand going to jail = I don't like going to jail (and it suggests that you have, at some point, been to jail and you didn't like it!)

    I won't stand for going to jail = I refuse to accept the possibility of going to jail.

    I can't stand John = I hate John.

    I won't stand for John's behaviour = I won't accept his behaving like that / I won't allow him to behave like that.

  10. #10
    Barb_D's Avatar
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    Re: I can't stand it

    And again, my usage is exactly the same.

    "I won't stand for" is not the same as "I can't stand."
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

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