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  1. #11
    philadelphia is offline Senior Member
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      • Student or Learner
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      • Home Country:
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    Default Re: Colloquial English

    Quote Originally Posted by shroob View Post
    Not a teacher only a native speaker.

    You might be a long time compiling that list, and even then there will be large variations between regions let alone countries. For example in England people from different counties (regions) have totally different words for the same thing.

    For example in reference to an earlier post, I'm from Yorkshire and if it wasn't for visiting Newcastle United fans I wouldn't know what a 'tab' was, I would call them a cigarette. I even had problems being understood at university as I was told my accent was strong and some words I used utterly perplexed some people.

    So while I wish you luck in your quest, I think it will be a long one, I wouldn't be too worried if you do visit an English speaking country, you seem to have a good grasp of it already so I don't think you will have any problems.
    Thanks - I noted it. I have heard some Yorkshire accents on youtube (eg YouTube - My Beautiful Northern English Accent may you confirm this is a Yorkshire accent?) and from films a couple of times. Your accent seems to be very appreciated by lots of native speakers and it sometimes has got them smiling. Your pronunciation of some words are quite original while those very words are quite common - I just like it.

    You are raising a good point: the accent. Different and/or strong pronunciation/s can likely make non-native speakers get lost and even might make native speakers get lost as well. We French are more inclined to understand AmE accent better. Indeed, their pronunciation is closer to ours as they do not stress the words very often.

    By the way, how do you usually say the number 0? For instance, when you are giving your phone number, do you say oh or zero or naught/nought for 0? I am rather used to hearing oh but a couple of days ago an Aussie said naught. Does it depend on the speakers (different classes), the countries, the counties, etc?
    One more thing, which greeting are you more used to using? How are you? How's it going? How do you do? What's up? I know it depends on the situation, so how could it go with friends? Please, provide the contractions of the words that you use in rapid speech.

    My pocket is really full of questions.

    Quote Originally Posted by Mister Nutty View Post
    If you've never been to an English country, and want to understand word English speakers say, watch tons of English movies. That's a good way to train your ears!
    Thanks, that is what I have been doing for months.

  2. #12
    emsr2d2's Avatar
    emsr2d2 is offline Moderator
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      • English Teacher
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    Default Re: Colloquial English

    Quote Originally Posted by philadelphia View Post
    Thanks - I noted it. I have heard some Yorkshire accents on youtube (eg YouTube - My Beautiful Northern English Accent may you confirm this is a Yorkshire accent?) and from films a couple of times. Your accent seems to be very appreciated by lots of native speakers and it sometimes has got them smiling. Your pronunciation of some words are quite original while those very words are quite common - I just like it.

    You are raising a good point: the accent. Different and/or strong pronunciation/s can likely make non-native speakers get lost and even might make native speakers get lost as well. We French are more inclined to understand AmE accent better. Indeed, their pronunciation is closer to ours as they do not have a strong accent.

    By the way, how do you usually say the number 0? For instance, when you are giving your phone number, do you say oh or zero or naught/nought for 0? I am rather used to hearing oh but a couple of days ago an Aussie said naught. Does it depend on the speakers (different classes), the countries, the counties, etc?
    One more thing, which greeting are you more used to saying? How are you? How's it going? How do you do? What's up? I know it depends on the situation, so how could it go with friends? Please, provide the contractions of the words that you use in rapid speech.

    My pocket is really full of questions.
    Thanks, that is what I have been doing for months.
    As far as the use of zero/nought etc is concerned, you will not only get a whole range of answer but probably more people, like me, who use different forms depending on the situation.

    When I'm talking to friends or someone informal, I'll say "oh".
    When giving my number over the telephone, or in a more formal situation, I'll say "zero".
    Personally, I never use "nought" for phone numbers.

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