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    #1

    a few connotations of "tackle"

    Dear teachers,

    Would you be kind enough to tell me whether I am right with my interpretation of the expressions in bold in the following sentences?


    To launch oneself in a flying tackle.

    flying tackle = blocking, taking both legs

    We tackled the cold beef. = We pounced on the cold beef.

    He tackled the chicken. = He got his teeth into chicken.

    I'll tackle you.

    I had so many books to tackle. = I had to dig a lot of books.

    I'll tackle him on the point.

    I don't know how to tackle it.

    You should tackle the postscript first.

    We have to tackle the problem.

    He tackled his material problems. - He took the decision of their material problems.

    He tackled his opponents. = He came into a heated argument with his opponents.

    You will tackle up and go over. – Harness horse and go .

    (Tackle up to saddle or put the horse to the cart)

    They tackled the thief. = They caught the thief.

    Thanks for your efforts.

    Regards,

    V.

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    #2

    Re: a few connotations of "tackle"

    Not a teacher.

    "Tackle" comes from American football. Each play in football ends when the player in possession of the ball is "tackled." You tackle someone by using your arms and body to force the ball-carrier to the ground. You literally throw your body into that of the other player in order to bring him to the ground.

    By metaphor, to tackle something is to throw your entire being, your entire effort into the endeavour. It is also a victory for you when you tackle something or someone successfully.

    So I doubt the people in question were pouncing on some beef. More likely they were eating it with much enthusiasm. Your other examples are likewise metaphorical.

    Except for the thief. Reading this, I would assume that someone or ones physically stopped the thief by tackling him as you would a football player.

    The only other oddball is the one about the horse. This is a different word "tackle." It means the equipment or gear that one would put on a horse. (It's also used by fishermen, who carry their stuff in a "tackle box.") It's a different word, except for being spelled and pronounced the same.

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    #3

    Re: a few connotations of "tackle"

    Hi ShootingDave,

    Don’t you know really that there was a world before the appearance of USA and not at all before the arising of the American Football.

    “Tackle” is a very old word with a wide range of connotations which are poles apart.
    You may enlarge your scanty dictionary reading the following links:

    So you probably would make the sense of the following sentence which meaning have nothing to do with American Football.

    The government's measures to tackle crime were insufficient.

    Online Etymology Dictionary

    http://www.answers.com/main/ntquery?s=tackle&gwp=13

    http://www.thefreedictionary.com/tackle

    Regards,

    V.

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    #4

    Re: a few connotations of "tackle"

    I am trying to help another understand the metaphorical use of the word by explaining by comparison the more literal meaning. I realize the word has other meanings, I said so in my post, regarding the horse "tackle."

  1. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: a few connotations of "tackle"

    Quote Originally Posted by vil View Post
    You may enlarge your scanty dictionary reading the following links:
    This is really quite a rude thing to say to someone who is trying to help you understand how these words are used. If you are going to lecture HIM on the word's meaning, it seems a waste of your time and ours for you to post your sentences and ask if you understand it.

    His name is soothing, by the way, not shooting.

    Unrelated to my comments above, I've heard about horse tack, but not tackle. (Fishing tackle, yes.) Are there people who actually ride (or who have ridden) who could let us know if it's called tackle or tack? In practice, do you actually say "tackle the horse"?

    A flying tackle means you actually left the ground to bring the person down.
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

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    #6

    Re: a few connotations of "tackle"

    I’ll save myself trouble to utter my habitual rough but veracious words this once making use of the words of people which are to a large degree more brainy than all of us.

    The First Amendment is known and cherished by virtually all citizens, who comprehend its essence even if they may not be able to recite its precise phrasing.

    “For the time will come when they will not endure sound doctrine; but after their own lusts shall they heap to themselves teachers, having itching ears; And they shall turn away their ears from the truth, and shall be turned unto fables.”

    Itching ears is a term used in the Bible to describe a person who seeks out messages that please
    them and fit their lifestyle, as opposed to seeking a truth that might make them uncomfortable.

    Fable = A falsehood; a lie

    Here is an excerpt from the Freedicctionary (please see my post above)

    2.tackle - put a harness; "harness the horse"
    harness
    animal husbandry - breeding and caring for farm animals
    attach - cause to be attached
    in-span- attach a yoke or harness to; "in-span the draft animals"

    In my humble opinion there is a subtle difference between “tack” and “tackle” although both are relevant to the horses and some wise guys allege that tack is shortened from tackle.

    tack - definition of tack by the Free Online Dictionary, Thesaurus and Encyclopedia.

    In practice, do you actually say "tackle the horse"? (Quotation)

    Yes, my grandfather did that. He harnessed and tackled our multiple horses as well as he yoked our five oxen.

    Do you really think that “tackle” is relevant only with that savage game “American Football”?

    V.

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    #7

    Re: a few connotations of "tackle"

    Why did you post this thread if you already knew all of the answers?

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    #8

    Re: a few connotations of "tackle"

    I am on no account supposed to be a know-all but I know for certain on which side my bread is buttered..

    Usually I like to see how the land lies.

    I have been studying English for five years but I haven’t learned it yet.

    I am sure that with the help of the teachers and the spontaneous native English speakers of the present forum will pick up the language in no time.

    Because of mentioned above I asked them many questions. Sometimes I make an attempt to have an useful discussion but now and then I infringed the custom since I distinguish myself by a bad and biting language. Usually I wear my heart on my sleeve so sometimes I could have bitten my thong off.

    I hope you won’t choke on faced with so many pretentious I in so concise writing.

    V.

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    #9

    Re: a few connotations of "tackle"

    This thread has turned rather snappy and I see no need for this- it just discolours things and makes it unpleasant for everybody. Please try to disagree with what people say rather than with the person.

    I am quite sure that SoothingDave is aware that the universe actually predates the invention of American football, and using this term rather than simply calling it football, which many Americans do, would put the matter beyond all doubt for me.

    People post and sometimes their phrasing may not be perfect- I've omitted crucial words like not before now and and given out advice exactly the opposite of what I intended to say. Was there really a need to come down like that?

    I have to say that I thought it was uncalled for.

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    #10

    Re: a few connotations of "tackle"

    I had so many books to tackle = I had to read a lot of books.



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