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    • Join Date: Jun 2005
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    #1

    days of the week

    Are the days of the week promounced with an short /i/ at the end or with
    /deI/? Are both ways correct and possible? If not, which one is correct?
    Thanx!

  1. Casiopea's Avatar

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    #2

    Re: days of the week

    The final sound in "day" is called a diphthong. A diphthong (pronounced dif'thong, not dip'thong) is made up of two sounds: one sound is always a vowel, and the other sound is always a glide, either [j] ("y") or [w].

    If the glide comes first, the diphthong is called an onglide (start on a glide), and if the glide comes last, the diphthong is called an offglide (end off with a glide), like this,

    Onglide: [ja] ("ya")
    Offglide: [aj] ("eye")

    As for the word "day", the letters "ay" are pronounced [ej], as on offglide, and it's currently written as [eI].

    All the best,


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    #3

    Re: days of the week

    ok. In my dictionary it says that Monday is pronounced /mʌndi/;
    why not /mʌndei/?? Would that be a wrong pronunciation? BTW, I know what a diphthong is, I teach English as a foreign language, and when I went to school they taught us /mʌndei/, but our university teachers said different, and Longman's dictionary says different. So, I'm curious if both are possible and correct.
    Thanx

  2. ElectricDemon's Avatar

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    #4

    Re: days of the week

    Maybe it's the dialect? I've heard about 3 versions from native speakers.

  3. Casiopea's Avatar

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    #5

    Re: days of the week

    Mon[deI] is the standard, the long form, and Mon[di] is one of its variants, or its short form. The difference between the two is not a matter of dialect variation. (I use both.) The difference has to do with ease of speech, and a processes called Reduction.

    The offglide [eI], also written [ej], has two parts: a vowel [e] and a glide [j]. The vowel [e] is omitted, leaving the glide [j], like this,

    Mond|ej| => Mond|j| => Mond[i]

    Note, the symbols [I] and [j] represent the same sound, a palatal glide. When that glide functions as a vowel, it's written [i]. That's the sound we hear in reduced Mond[i].

    All the best,

  4. ElectricDemon's Avatar

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    #6

    Re: days of the week

    Thank you for clearing it up for me too. I've just realised I use both variants (never noticed until I read this topic)


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    #7

    Re: days of the week

    Thank ya all

  5. Casiopea's Avatar

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    #8

    Re: days of the week

    Welcome.

  6. ElectricDemon's Avatar

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    #9

    Re: days of the week

    Quote Originally Posted by Casiopea
    If the glide comes first, the diphthong is called an onglide (start on a glide), and if the glide comes last, the diphthong is called an offglide (end off with a glide), like this,

    Onglide: [ja] ("ya")
    Offglide: [aj] ("eye")

    As for the word "day", the letters "ay" are pronounced [ej], as on offglide, and it's currently written as [eI].
    Can I have a question too? What if someone pronounces ... say 'today' [to-die]. I think I do it most of the time .
    Last edited by ElectricDemon; 20-Jun-2005 at 20:16.

  7. Casiopea's Avatar

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    #10

    Re: days of the week

    Quote Originally Posted by ElectricDemon
    Can I have a question too? What if someone pronounces ... say 'today' [to-die]. I think do it most of the time .
    Actually, it'd be written, [tu'dai] ([ai] as in the sounds represented by the underlined portion in "pie".)

    It's a dialect variant, that's all. Keep on using it.

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