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  1. #1
    vil is offline VIP Member
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    Default peep of day/ peep of dawn/peep of morning

    Dear teachers,

    Lately I stumbled on the extravagant for me phrase “ the peep of dawn”. This cane to be by reading a covered with dust issue of the Scott’s “Quentin Durward”.

    By peep of day Quentin Durward had forsaken his little cell, had roused his sleepy grooms, and, with more than his wonted care, seen that everything was prepared for the day’s journey.

    Would you be kind enough to tell me whether the phrase in question is common in contemporary English?

    peep of dawn = at daybreak = towards break of day = by daybreak

    Thanks for your efforts.

    Regard,

    V

  2. #2
    emsr2d2's Avatar
    emsr2d2 is offline Moderator
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    Default Re: peep of day/ peep of dawn/peep of morning

    Quote Originally Posted by vil View Post
    Dear teachers,

    Lately I stumbled on the extravagant for me phrase “ the peep of dawn”. This cane to be by reading a covered with dust issue of the Scott’s “Quentin Durward”.

    By peep of day Quentin Durward had forsaken his little cell, had roused his sleepy grooms, and, with more than his wonted care, seen that everything was prepared for the day’s journey.

    Would you be kind enough to tell me whether the phrase in question is common in contemporary English?

    peep of dawn = at daybreak = towards break of day = by daybreak

    Thanks for your efforts.

    Regard,

    V
    Due to the subtle meaning suggested by the word peep, I would read it to mean the point at which the tiniest little bit of sun appears over the horizon at sunrise. The sun is just "peeping" over the horizon. But your general understanding is correct.

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