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Thread: FORCE

  1. #1
    Will17 is offline Senior Member
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    Cool FORCE

    Hello,

    What's the difference between:

    -To force someone to do something

    -To force someone into doing something.

    Thanks a lot

    W

  2. #2
    vil is offline VIP Member
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    Default Re: FORCE

    I’m not a teacher.

    Hi Will17,

    In my humble opinion there are the following common collocations of “force” :

    They forced their way into the building.

    We were forced off the road.

    She tried to force her views on us.

    I don’t want to force my way through a crowd.

    They forced her to sign.

    He forced the door open.

    The last but one example is similar to your “To force someone to do something”.

    In this pattern, transitive verbs are followed by an object and to + infinitive. Typical examples of this construction are: she asked me to come; they challenged us to fight; we forced them to leave; she permitted the children to watch television.

    Regards,

    V.

  3. #3
    Tullia's Avatar
    Tullia is offline Senior Member
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    Default Re: FORCE

    Quote Originally Posted by Will17 View Post
    Hello,

    What's the difference between:

    -To force someone to do something

    -To force someone into doing something.

    Thanks a lot

    W


    Hi there. Either is acceptable and for the most part you would probably be able to use either. The difference in meaning is, in my opinion, pretty subtle.

    The first option is very direct, you were the direct cause of them doing something; perhaps even physical force could have been involved.

    My mum is forcing me to stay at home and revise; I can't come out tonight.
    The cashier was forced at gunpoint to empty the safe for the thieves.



    If the situation means that your actions were a little more remote, perhaps you didn't intend to create the effect even, then you could use the latter.

    The garage down the road has dropped the price of petrol, so the one closer to me has been forced into doing the same to stay competitive.


    I don't want my boyfriend to feel forced into proposing just because all our friends are getting married. I want him to mean it.




    However, I think the difference is really very subtle, and it wouldn't be wrong to use the constructions interchangeably in most situations.

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