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Thread: Old money?

  1. #1
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    Default Old money?

    what does it mean? especially "old money" in this sentence? Is "it" in "its" referring to the "entrance"? Doesn't make too much sense for me if it is.

    "Daniel made this undistinguished entrance in the school of a quaint lakeside village known for its old money, white colonial homes and brass mailboxes."

  2. #2
    Tdol is offline Editor, UsingEnglish.com
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    Default Re: Old money?

    Old money is money that was made a long time ago and has passed through generations. The Rothschild's are old money, while Silicon valley is new money.

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    Default Re: Old money?

    Quote Originally Posted by tdol
    Old money is money that was made a long time ago and has passed through generations. The Rothschild's are old money, while Silicon valley is new money.
    thanks. But still what does the whole sentence mean? Does it mean Daniel entered this school in a low key, unnoticed way or he made the physical door/gate of the school known for old money and etc...(I guess the latter doesn't make much sense, huh?)---if it's the former then why it doesn't say, "Daniel made his entrance"?

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    Default Re: Old money?

    "Daniel made this undistinguished entrance in the school of a quaint lakeside village known for its old money, white colonial homes and brass mailboxes."

    'old money' is defined within the sentence itself: 'white colonial homes and brass mailboxes.'

    'undistinguished' means, mediocre, indifferent in quality, second-rate.

    'this undistinguished entrance' refers to a particular way of doing something. You could also say, 'He made an undistinguished entrance', one that wasn't particular in kind. If you wanted to say 'He made his entrance' the possessive pronoun 'his' expresses a definite kind of entrance, one that Daniel owns, one that reflects his character. In comparison, 'this undistinguished entrance' leaves it up to the reader (maybe it's even stated further back or ahead in the context) to decide the way in which Daniel acted out the undistinguished entrance. Consider, Daniel made this (particular kind) of undistinguished entrance. 'particular kind' is left for the reader to determine/guess.

    'its' is possessive pronoun, and it refers to 'school':

    'the school . . . (is) known for its old money.'

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    Default Re: Old money?

    Quote Originally Posted by Casiopea
    "Daniel made this undistinguished entrance in the school of a quaint lakeside village known for its old money, white colonial homes and brass mailboxes."

    'old money' is defined within the sentence itself: 'white colonial homes and brass mailboxes.'

    'undistinguished' means, mediocre, indifferent in quality, second-rate.

    'this undistinguished entrance' refers to a particular way of doing something. You could also say, 'He made an undistinguished entrance', one that wasn't particular in kind. If you wanted to say 'He made his entrance' the possessive pronoun 'his' expresses a definite kind of entrance, one that Daniel owns, one that reflects his character. In comparison, 'this undistinguished entrance' leaves it up to the reader (maybe it's even stated further back or ahead in the context) to decide the way in which Daniel acted out the undistinguished entrance. Consider, Daniel made this (particular kind) of undistinguished entrance. 'particular kind' is left for the reader to determine/guess.

    'its' is possessive pronoun, and it refers to 'school':

    'the school . . . (is) known for its old money.'
    I didn't expect it could be explained in such a clear, detailed way. Thank you very much!

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