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Thread: declining opus

  1. Bushwhacker's Avatar
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    #1

    Cool declining opus

    How is properly said in English an opus, any kind of art work (movie, paintings...) reflecting it is one of the last of its style or one of the last of its artist? In Spanish it is used "crepuscular" in this sense, but I don't know if "crepuscular" (from twilight) is also used in English meaning those last artistic tail flaps?

    Thank You for your help

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    #2

    Re: declining opus

    Crepuscular wouldn't give me that meaning- maybe you could use a phrase like the dying days for an artistic movement. For an individual, it's just their last/final work IMO.

  2. Bushwhacker's Avatar
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    #3

    Cool Re: declining opus

    Quote Originally Posted by Tdol View Post
    Crepuscular wouldn't give me that meaning- maybe you could use a phrase like the dying days for an artistic movement. For an individual, it's just their last/final work IMO.
    Thank You, and if the work is the next to last one?

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    #4

    Re: declining opus

    Not a teacher.

    "Swan song" is the term used for the final and greatest work of an artist.

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    #5

    Re: declining opus

    ...and if the work is the next to last one?
    We call that the penultimate.

    Rover

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    #6

    Re: declining opus

    Do you have an adjective in English that could be used to mean "related to or made in the final part of some era/period/century or somebody's life"? We have such an adjective in Polish but dictionaries I've looked it up in translate it into "decadent" which I think is wrong. As far as I know "decadent" always has a pejorative meaning and the Polish word doesn't have to have it.

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    #7

    Re: declining opus

    I don't think we have, but we are happy to borrow the French term fin de siecle (I can't do the grave accent), which means more than end of the (19th) century. It can also refer to the end of an era.

    Fin de siècle - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    Rover

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    #8

    Re: declining opus

    Quote Originally Posted by birdeen's call View Post
    Do you have an adjective in English that could be used to mean "related to or made in the final part of some era/period/century or somebody's life"? We have such an adjective in Polish but dictionaries I've looked it up in translate it into "decadent" which I think is wrong. As far as I know "decadent" always has a pejorative meaning and the Polish word doesn't have to have it.
    We don't (to my knowledge), but artistic and literary commentators often use the term 'middle years': '... typical of Thackeray in his middle years'.

    As to 'crepuscular', we don't commonly use that word as Tdol said, but Bushwacker actually used the word we do use: 'twilight' (as a adjective - example: 'in his twilight years') To be dismissive of an artist's work towards the end of his life, you can use the phrase 'in his dotage' - if someone produces a work 'in his dotage' the implication is that it's not very good.

    b

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    #9

    Re: declining opus

    Does the expression "his twilight years" convey the meaning of deterioration?

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    #10

    Re: declining opus

    No - or at least, not in his printed output! (His eyesight's probably not as good as it was!)

    b

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