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  1. #1
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    Post Dangling modifier?

    Does this sentence contain a dangling modifier?

    (Original)
    Without trees, the soil is washed away by storms, making it much easier for floods to occur.

    As for me, the underliend part of the original sentence seems to be a contracted form of a non-defining clause:

    (Revised sentence with a non-defining relative clause)
    Without trees, the soil is washed away by storms, which makes it much easier for floods to occur.

    In the revised sentence, "which" seems to replace the whole preceding sentence "the soil is washed away by storms".

    I have a question here.

    What can we call the underlined part? is it a participle clause? Or is it a contracted form of a non-denining relative clause? Of course, I agree with the latter. (If we consider the underlined part a kind of participle clause, it would be a dangling modifier.) But is it possible to use such a contracted form of a non-definging relative clause even though the contracted form looks like a dangling modifier?
    Last edited by critic72; 16-Jun-2005 at 21:29.

  2. #2
    Tdol is offline Editor, UsingEnglish.com
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    Re: Dangling modifier?

    I don't think I'd call it a dangling modifier because you have the empty subject 'it' there and I think it's a reduced relative clause. A strict interpretation might make it a dangling modifier, but is there really any great confusion or ambiguity here? I don't think so. I don't have any problems with the original sentence.

  3. #3
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    Re: Dangling modifier?

    Thank you, tdol^^
    Paradoxically, Korean school grammar applies stricter rules than natives do. I agree with you that there is no problem in understanding the sentence.
    Thank you
    Last edited by critic72; 17-Jun-2005 at 05:48.

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